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Senate Bill 3127-S

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  • Senate Bill 3127-S

    Just an FYI
    https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-...bill/3127/text
    Look to the ground for it holds the past!

  • #2
    https://www.congress.gov/114/bills/s...114s3127is.pdf

    Has it passed?
    TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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    • #3
      No they are not in session. I believe it is still in committee.
      Look to the ground for it holds the past!

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      • #4
        In see a man called Mr. Flake. Kind of ironic isn't it?
        The chase is better than the catch...

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        • #5
          Chase - I didn't real all the references that accompanied this proposed amendment, but don't these criminal penalties apply to Native American Grave artifacts and artifacts that can be attributed to a specific Native American Tribe??? ...Chuck
          NE Central Tenn - Any day on this side of the grass is a good day. -Chuck-

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          • #6
            It appears that way but I think there is more to it. and until it goes to the senate and House who knows how it will play out. Anytime the government gets involved Its not good IMO
            Look to the ground for it holds the past!

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            • #7
              Hi Chase. Thank you for bringing this to our attention. I have concerns as no doubt you also have.

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              • #8
                Here is another article about the law. It shares some information about why they are pushing for this. http://www.indianz.com/News/2016/07/...to-stop-th.asp
                TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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                • #9
                  The article Matt posted reminded me this stems from the recent auctions of Hopi religious items in Paris, over the past few years. Some were returned to the Hopi after being won via the auctions. Anyway, here's some background regarding these oversea auctions of articles regarded as religious and communal by such still living cultures as the Hopi, descencent from Ancestral Puebloan. These ethnographic items are not to be confused with the arrowheads we pick up off the ground:-). If you google Hopi artifacts and French auctions, you'll get many articles. I recall posting a thread here about them at the time, when quite a few were bought specifically so they could be given back to the Hopi, and that angle was in the news at the time.

                  http://www.theatlantic.com/internati...uction/484316/

                  http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...235293761.html
                  Last edited by CMD; 01-11-2017, 09:46 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CMD View Post
                    The article Matt posted reminded me this stems from the recent auctions of Hopi religious items in Paris, over the past few years. Some were returned to the Hopi after being won via the auctions. Anyway, here's some background regarding these oversea auctions of articles regarded as religious and communal by such still living cultures as the Hopi, descencent from Ancestral Puebloan. These ethnographic items are not to be confused with the arrowheads we pick up off the ground:-). If you google Hopi artifacts and French auctions, you'll get many articles. I recall posting a thread here about them at the time, when quite a few were bought specifically so they could be given back to the Hopi, and that angle was in the news at the time.

                    http://www.theatlantic.com/internati...uction/484316/

                    http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...235293761.html
                    Thanks Charlie and Hoss for the articles. My concern is who mandates what is or is not a religious artifact. and how it was acquired. I see this as a way to shut down all hunting of NA past. I see nothing as to a grandfather clause . I see vague terms with nothing to not include or exclude any artifacts. and trade oversees to trade within the states.
                    Maybe I am not looking at this right and yes I would like to see any artifact stay in the country of origin.
                    Look to the ground for it holds the past!

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                    • #11
                      Here is a good read. I got from another forum.
                      https://www.thecrimson.com/article/1...easure/?page=1
                      Look to the ground for it holds the past!

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                      • #12
                        I think the Hopi had a pretty clear idea of what constituted a religious article to their culture. And in the instances I posted articles involving, it was mostly about the Hopi specifically. They tried every which way possible to actually stop the auctions, unsuccessfully. For very personal reasons, I will always back the Hopi, and I deferred to their judgement completely in these particular instances. My relationship to the Hopi goes back almost. 50 years now, and I am very biased. I fully supported their victory getting Bears Ears designated a National Monument, and I really have no problem allowing tribes to make the call as to whether an article is still a living symbol with spiritual import within their culture.

                        But I am biased and I actually don't care what effect it might have on collectors. Collectors are just not my first priority in this instance. I certainly don't expect that to be a consensus opinion among collectors. Obviously. But this is about exporting outside the country. Does it mean someone cannot sell an arrowhead on eBay to an individual in Europe? I doubt it, but it isn't my biggest concern. chase, I think you're fully entitled to your point of view. Collectors tend to be paranoid where government is concerned. I can appreciate that, but I side with the tribes in supporting this. Not to start an argument, each collector can decide for themselves how they feel about a lot of issues that can be generated just examining acts such as this. If it helps prevent export of items the tribes feel should not even be treated as collectables in the first place, I'm glad. Maybe it won't help at all. All I know is I fully support it. I don't see it as a way to kill collecting at all. The bill stems from the outcry that ensued over the Paris auctions of Hopi religious items. If someone thinks it is going to morph into a total shutdown of all collecting activity, throughout the United States, we'll see I guess. For me personally, with the global and national problems I see unfolding in my remaining lifetime, it won't rise to the status of an issue for me. But maybe it's too easy for me to say. I can understand if it causes worry among collectors.

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