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Special New England ASAA Meeting

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  • clambellies
    replied
    It's killing me that I can't make that meeting. Our kids gave us a "weekend get-away" for that Saturday. I hate it when they do something nice for us. lol -

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  • CMD
    commented on 's reply
    Looking forward to that day, Ethan!

  • Kentucky point
    replied
    I have said it before, I'll say it again: I will be there one day!

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  • Sage hen jack
    replied
    Looks to be interesting and fun! Enjoy đź‘Ť

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  • CMD
    started a topic Special New England ASAA Meeting

    Special New England ASAA Meeting

    I put "special" in the title because one, Duncan is one of the most interesting archaeologists I know, a very entertaining speaker, and two, the subject matter is largely unknown to most collectors, regarding one of America's most famous 19th century authors and a passionate devotee of what he called "arrowheading". Who knew? Hope to see our New England members there, it should be a great day!

    American Society for Amateur Archaeology—New England Chapter



    SATURDAY, June 29, 2019

    TIME: 12-3 P.M.



    PLACE: South Shore Natural Science Center 48 Jacobs Lane, Norwell, MA.(Please see our website)









    Presentation:

    “Mind Prints, Arrowheads, the Indians & Thoreau”



    ASAA member and archaeologist Duncan Caldwell will be our guest speaker.

    (His lecture was originally presented on May 4, 2018 at the University of Gothenburg.) The presentation will move from an examination of Henry David Thoreau’s relationship with prehistoric artifacts to a demonstration of the ways that collecting them affected his relationship with the natural world, time, and Native Americans. It will show that artifact hunting—or “arrowheading” as Thoreau called it—changed his thinking so radically that he moved from seeing the "American Race” as being doomed to seeing it as enduring. More importantly, it will show that he died with a cry against the persecution of Native Americans on his lips. Those words would have taken the form of a book in one-to-three volumes that he was planning to write about “arrowheading,” but which would have been as limited to the subject of artifacts as Walden was to describing a pond. Luckily, he left enough journal entries and other texts to reconstruct both the ways arrowheading altered his thinking and the scope of the book, which would have become a monument that would have changed how Thoreau is perceived today.





    Also, always: SHOW AND TELL, and EXPERT IDENTIFICATION



    PLEASE BRING YOUR ARTIFACTS!!

    Invite your friends!



    PUBLIC ALWAYS WELCOME! FREE ADMISSION!
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