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  • antmike915
    commented on 's reply
    Lol, negative.

  • zenjojo
    commented on 's reply
    Does that include debitage?

  • Savage1!
    replied
    Wow, awesome article. That location isn't too far from my house.
    Last edited by Savage1!; 07-24-2021, 06:32 AM.

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  • AJGamby
    replied
    That's a lot of flint! Interesting ratio of coshocton to flint ridge blades in there. That being said it looks like a couple of the FR blades are heated to me which, leaning more towards it being later than clovis. Thanks for those pics Ron!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cecilia
    commented on 's reply
    O yes, Ron, thanks!

  • Ron Kelley
    replied
    AJ I hope this helps:

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  • AJGamby
    replied
    it really is one amazing cache! I know there has been some talk on the FB groups that this looks to be maybe something later than clovis. Some of them look like jacks reef preforms to me, but I do see some heavy flake removals typical of the clovis guys. I would love to see more of the cache!

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  • Ron Kelley
    commented on 's reply
    There is some outstanding Clovis flaking in those caches. The Texas Alibates is beautiful.

  • Hoss
    commented on 's reply
    I thought the same thing when i saw it. I think some archaeologists like to generate excitement in order to get more grants. In the end after more study and the findings through grant procurement the findings can be very accurate or they are not exact. Its a nice cache and a great find but I am not seeing the same technology as I have seen in other clovis caches.

  • Hoss
    replied
    Some great articles on Clovis Caches from Bob Patten's web page Stone Dagger. Good info on the Busse Cache the Fenn Cache and more.

    Brief description of Clovis cache contents.

    Leave a comment:


  • clovisoid
    commented on 's reply
    Yup, I've seen that cache, I believe it's the Busse Cache. No Clovis points, but plenty of Clovis technology and the classic patter of very large tools because they were working biface cores. There are a couple of caches/reported caches like that.
    Last edited by clovisoid; 06-15-2021, 06:02 PM.

  • beatup1354
    commented on 's reply
    there was a cache of bifaces and blades dug up not to long ago in colorado by landscapers working at a home most was green river chert no classic clovis points but their utility type of tools were found the interesting thing i recall about it was when the did a dna workup on the tools they found blood of the types of animals they hunted

  • clovisoid
    commented on 's reply
    That is absolutely cool, only a couple of feet from one of the most amazing caches. I have resin casts of a couple of the bifaces, and they are simply amazing.

    The dilemma with finding a cache like that now is that almost no one would believe the finder. I'd still love to find one, but there would always be a very public contingent of people who would claim fraud.

  • clovisoid
    replied
    Seems like several people have picked up on the "what makes them Clovis" question, even the authors to some degree. I certainly wouldn't have thought they were Clovis, or even paleo for that matter. If it were a Clovis cache, it would be unique among the recognized caches for several reasons.

    If you google Coshocton Cache you can see pictures of small triangular Coshocton biface caches. Most of them tend to be triangle lances, but they can come in a variety of shapes and sizes.

    Coshocton Caches aren't common finds, but as far as caches go in Ohio & Indiana they are probably the most common type. Coshocton from some of the outcrops comes in pretty small chunks, and groups made small bifaces from small pieces and left the area with them. They typically aren't finely made, nor are they big, ceremonial pieces (like many of the Adena & Hopewell biface caches), they are more like the equivalent of stocking up on toilet paper at Sam's Club/Costco. Personally, that's what I think the authors of the paper have here, a much later utilitarian cache like the dozens and dozens of others that have been found and reported in several journals by collectors and analyzed by professionals over the years.

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  • Tam
    replied
    Great listening to this . Thank you for posting .
    We do run to animal digs .

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