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  • lets see some triangles

    lets see some triangles
    Posted by [GA_Dave]

    Moderator Note: this thread was first posted in 2012 but failed to transfer across to the new forum when the software was updated, and so has been re-created manually.



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    GA triangles. hope u enjoy.


    Posted by [GA_Dave]

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    Posted by [rmartin]
    That big one is sweet Dave! Since you asked here is one of my Madison frames from Illinois.

    http://i1080.photobucket.com/albums/...facts181-1.jpg not found


    Posted by [turkeytail]

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    The yellow jasper Levanna is currently on ebay...cammark10.


    Posted by [CMD]
    Great stuff, Dave, and that big Madison is a killer! Here's my 2 favorite Levannas. One on left my wife Helen found, made of hornfels, a volcanic rock that flakes nice, and I found the quartz one on an island in Narragansett Bay.

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    Posted by [turkeytail]
    Great pieces and great thread Dave! :cheer:
    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

  • #2
    Posted by [tomclark]
    sweet triangles, folks! Might we agree they are all the same "type"?~?!?!? All are true arrowhead time period no matter where you are, Woodland period. I'm a lumper. Woodland Triangular.
    This type has more local names than probably any other!
    Ahem.... A Pinellas from Pinellas Co.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...s/Pinellas.jpg not found

    They are only common at specific sites here. Sorta rare. I have hundreds of points and these are about half of all the triangles I've found in all the years I've been hunting!

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...inellasPts.jpg not found


    Posted by [rmartin]
    I agree these are all true arrow points and fall into the same time period. However, in this area, they belong to the Mississippian culture not Woodland. Differences in the cultures include pottery, burial practices, farming methods, and settlement patterns.


    Posted by [GA_Dave]
    rmartin wrote:
    I agree these are all true arrow points and fall into the same time period. However, in this area, they belong to the Mississippian culture not Woodland. Differences in the cultures include pottery, burial practices, farming methods, and settlement patterns.

    would u say the ones with the concave base fall under yadkins.thanks for the pics

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    Posted by [CMD ]
    All beautiful examples, folks. I agree the Madisons and its' regional relatives are all true arrowheads. But I'm not sure that's the case with all Levannas, as they can be sizable at times. Boudreau's New England regional guide includes a Levanna with a slant height of just shy of 3"! But it's believed the real large ones may have been harpoon points. Also, Levannas and Madisons, at least here in the Northeast, are indeed different from each other. Levannas appeared in late Middle Woodland and were in use into the Contact Period. Madisons did not show up until Late Woodland into Contact Period. So I can't really say Levannas and Madisons are the same point, although they are both Woodland triangles. The earliest true arrowheads in New England are believed to be Jack's Reef Corner Notch points from the Middle Woodland.

    Posted by [rmartin]
    Dave, I have many Madisons from my area with concave bases. Great thread everyone, keep them coming!

    Posted by [tomclark]
    Yep, was thinking Woodland up to Late Preshistoric and even into historic.


    Posted by [riverbottom]
    those are all nice..... but I like the broken ones too.... Hahaha. :laugh:

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    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

    Comment


    • #3
      Posted by [GA_Dave]
      riverbottom wrote:
      those are all nice..... but I like the broken ones too.... Hahaha. :laugh:
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      u need a wheel barrel :laugh:



      Posted by [riverbottom]
      here's my baby.... Best triangle I've found

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      Posted by [CMD ]
      Here is a tiny, green quartzite Madison from RI.

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      The ones below are all Squibnocket Triangles, named by William Ritchie, state archaeologist of New York, after Squibnocket Pond on Martha's Vineyard. This type dates from Late Archaic into the earliest Woodland times. All personal finds from RI, and quite common in New England.

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      Posted by [rmartin]
      The top row are drill forms of triangles although they may be just highly resharpened projectiles.

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      I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

      Comment


      • #4
        Posted by [CMD ]
        These are Late Archaic Brewerton Eared Triangles. Often times, as in this first example, the ears are barely discernable.

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        It is also not unusual for Brewerton Eared Triangles to only have a single ear. When such triangles are resharpened a few times, here's what you get. Again, all personal finds from RI.

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        Posted by [CMD ]
        Once the Europeans were here, metal arrowheads, cut from brass and copper kettles became popular. Here is a frame from a 17th century Iroquois village site in New York state. The holes in these triangles may have aided in hafting or may have allowed the owner to carry his arrow points strung.

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        Posted by [flintmel]
        CMD wrote:
        All beautiful examples, folks. I agree the Madisons and its' regional relatives are all true arrowheads. But I'm not sure that's the case with all Levannas, as they can be sizable at times. Boudreau's New England regional guide includes a Levanna with a slant height of just shy of 3"! But it's believed the real large ones may have been harpoon points. Also, Levannas and Madisons, at least here in the Northeast, are indeed different from each other. Levannas appeared in late Middle Woodland and were in use into the Contact Period. Madisons did not show up until Late Woodland into Contact Period. So I can't really say Levannas and Madisons are the same point, although they are both Woodland triangles. The earliest true arrowheads in New England are believed to be Jack's Reef Corner Notch points from the Middle Woodland.

        Charl, have you been to the Dovecrest Museum on 165 in Exeter,RI? theres a 3x3 of black flint and its the largest triangle I've seen in these parts!


        Posted by [south fork]
        Here's a few Triangular points or performs off one site from California .

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        Posted by [Mt. Hope]
        I have only one...and that's it. Licking County, OH, field find. As far as I know, Ft. Ancient.

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        Posted by [CMD ]
        flintmel wrote:
        CMD wrote:
        All beautiful examples, folks. I agree the Madisons and its' regional relatives are all true arrowheads. But I'm not sure that's the case with all Levannas, as they can be sizable at times. Boudreau's New England regional guide includes a Levanna with a slant height of just shy of 3"! But it's believed the real large ones may have been harpoon points. Also, Levannas and Madisons, at least here in the Northeast, are indeed different from each other. Levannas appeared in late Middle Woodland and were in use into the Contact Period. Madisons did not show up until Late Woodland into Contact Period. So I can't really say Levannas and Madisons are the same point, although they are both Woodland triangles. The earliest true arrowheads in New England are believed to be Jack's Reef Corner Notch points from the Middle Woodland.

        Charl, have you been to the Dovecrest Museum on 165 in Exeter,RI? theres a 3x3 of black flint and its the largest triangle I've seen in these parts!

        It's been many years since I've been there, Mel. I'd like to see such a triangle! I like the community of Narragansetts that live there in the village of Arcadia as well. Great countryside. My favorite museum in our parts was the Tantaquidgeon Indian Museum in Uncasville, run for decades by Mohegan Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon. We spent hours there on 2 visits years ago and it was a great honor meeting her. I gave her a small frame of points from RI for her museum. I imagine you've been there, though I'm guessing it's closed since her passing and since the Mohegan Sun Casino opened.
        I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

        Comment


        • #5
          Posted by [CMD ]
          Nice one, Ruthie, and yes, looks like a Ft. Ancient. Dennis, that'a a nice display and color from California as well!

          Posted by [CoachG]
          You all have some real nice points on here. I'll try to put a few pics up when I get back.


          Posted by [flintmel]

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          Here'a few Conn. triangles, sorry some are mixed with stems


          Posted by [twoshovel]
          wow some realy nice triangles, here's proof the natives down here had perfected the art as to number there points much like the golfers do there clubs,,,twoshovel

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          Posted by [utilized flake]

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          broken triangles

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          my most perfect

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          my favorite creek triangle!
          I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

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          • #6
            Posted by [Jessed22]

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            My three killers! Flawless! B)

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            Posted by [Jessed22]
            here is a few more!

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            Posted by [greywolf22]
            Here are few central Texas T's

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            Jack


            Posted by [Armadillo]
            ..That is one beautiful arrowpoint and its got some length to it.Thats am excellent find..I wish I could giive some comments on the point types but thats way far east and out of my area. Here they are generally known as Maud or Talco. Some really nice examples shown above as well..Good thread Dave and that one you have is a super arrowpoint as well..Fantastic!!..Armadillo

            Posted by [GA_Dave]
            many thanks lot of nice stuff there thanks to all
            I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

            Comment


            • #7



              I love little triangles, here are a few.

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              • #8
                Southeast
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                http://joshinmo.weebly.com

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                • #9
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                  TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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                  • #10
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                    • #11
                      I haven't found many triangles the top two are my best from the NC piedmont the bottom two are my bests from the NC mountains. Click image for larger version

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                      N.C. from the mountains to the sea

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                      • #12
                        I’ve been trying to cut back lately but gave in this morning. I couldn’t resist this one. 1 5/8” long and 1 1/8” at the base and very thin. Here’s a few pictures.

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                        Von

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