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Paleoamerican Oddessy picture thread

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  • #16
    Thanks a bunch for taking the time to post those great pics here!!! I can't imagine how you felt with those three guys looking over your stuff.
    Like a drifter I was born to walk alone

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    • #17
      rmartin wrote:

      Thanks a bunch for taking the time to post those great pics here!!! I can't imagine how you felt with those three guys looking over your stuff.
        x2. And thanks for the great information as well!
      Rhode Island

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      • #18
        Thanks for sharing your trip Joshua.
        10,000 years and little or no change in technology? That's where I get lost.
        Cox's collection alone is amazing and particularly what came out of Cedar Creek alone, dumbfounding.
        A Folsom ultrathin right here in Indiana? Congrats on that. I've had got to spend more time kicking around in the dirt here!
        Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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        • #19
          Yes, it came from a bucket collection at a farm auction near Milford Indiana (Kosciosko County.)  There was another Folsom from the same county that is pictured on Bostrom's website, and in Prehistoric American.
          It stuck out like a sore thumb in the bucket, but I was never certain about what it was.  Several different Folsom experts saw it, and the width to thickness ratio, the bulbs of percussion, the way the flakes dive towards the middle, and the flatness of the piece are all indicative of the origin.
          Sorry, this is a really back picture I had where the flash wiped out some of the color.

          Click image for larger version

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          Last edited by painshill; 04-18-2020, 09:28 AM.
          Hong Kong, but from Indiana/Florida

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          • #20
            Great post Joshua.  A Folsom blade from Indiana fits well with Mike Gramly's theory of Cumberland culture spreading north from AL, TN and KY and spliting into Folsom moving westward and Parkhill going east.  Also interesting that Gramly speculates Cumberland could have arrived from South Amaerica with origins evidenced by fishtailed and El Jobo points.

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            • #21
              Ftperry wrote:

              Great post Joshua.  A Folsom blade from Indiana fits well with Mike Gramly's theory of Cumberland culture spreading north from AL, TN and KY and spliting into Folsom moving westward and Parkhill going east.  Also interesting that Gramly speculates Cumberland could have arrived from South Amaerica with origins evidenced by fishtailed and El Jobo points.
                Yep, we talked etensively about the Cumberland/El Jobo connection.  I sent Gramly home with a couple of pieces from a potentially older group than El Jobo (from an older river terrace.)  He's previously examined some of the Clovis, El Jobo -and- Fishtail material in my collection.
              I'm still not sure about the connection, I see more of loose Monte Verde, El Jobo, Haskett, Mesa connection (or stone points built like bone/ivory rods), but I'll share ideas and material with anyone seriously interested in it.
              Hong Kong, but from Indiana/Florida

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              • #22
                Great post Joshua, I knew someone would share these!  I had a great time meeting new folks and seeing the displays and hearing the talks. I came by several times to your frames but you must have been out and about seeing things. Talked with a few other members here, and made some new contacts for illustration work. (btw- 11KBP, sorry I missed you on the last day, I appreciate you talking with me and for your generous gift). I didn't have my camera for most of the conference, so I only have two photos to share. These are my illustrations for Dr. Frison's talk about the Powers II site in Wyoming. I worked on these over the summer, and I have a few more to do before he publishes. It was pretty cool seeing my illustrations as big as the wall! Plus, Frison is a class act, no arguing with him, he concentrates on his own work and doesn't let the Clovis first theory get in his way of research. Come to think of it, he doesn't let anything get in his way, even his ripe age of 89!

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                Clovis blade cores

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                bladelets
                Last edited by painshill; 04-18-2020, 09:31 AM.

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                • #23
                  Sorry, I missed you.  From the looks of the picture, I was a several rows behind you in this presentation.
                  I guess the final headcount was well over 1,000 each day, and that made for a crowded convention.
                  Hong Kong, but from Indiana/Florida

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                  • #24
                    Wow, reading this thread just makes me even more certain that I know nothing.  This is a very informative thread with fantastic pics.  I've not studied up much on Solutrean culture, but it is all very interesting.  Thanks everyone that shared.  Makes you think even harder where everyone came from, and where/how they developed their technology.

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