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Genetic Study Illuminates Bond Driving Peopling of the Americas

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  • Genetic Study Illuminates Bond Driving Peopling of the Americas

    https://www.inverse.com/article/5062...-south-america

  • #2
    That's a cool read. Thanks for posting it!

    Comment


    • #3
      I can't read It because of a huge popup.
      http://joshinmo.weebly.com

      Comment


      • CMD
        CMD commented
        Editing a comment
        Sorry I can't help you there. The study demonstrated the Clovis people reached as far as Brazil, and that about 4800 years ago, a population from the Channel Islands of California populated the southern Andes.

      • JoshinMO
        JoshinMO commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Charlie

    • #4
      https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S...showall%3Dtrue

      Click image for larger version

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      • #5
        Thanks for sharing Charlie. Interesting article
        My name is Gary. I live in NE South Dakota

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        • #6
          Great read. We have come a long way in a better understanding of the settling of the Americas. It will be interesting what the future brings.
          Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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          • #7
            Originally posted by gregszybala View Post
            Great read. We have come a long way in a better understanding of the settling of the Americas. It will be interesting what the future brings.
            And coincidently a second major genetic study, which confirms some of the findings, and differs in others, from the above paper:

            https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...ericas/575335/

            Comment


            • #8
              Does it seem strange that the DNA of the Titusville Florida bog mummies is never part of these Peopling of the America’s stories?

              Von
              Last edited by Von; 11-11-2018, 11:40 PM.

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              • #9
                Originally posted by Von View Post
                Does it seem strange that the DNA of the Titusville Florida bog mummies is never part of these Peopling of the America’s stories?

                Von
                In this case, I'm not certain since these studies involve the peopling of Central America and South America.

                Comment


                • CMD
                  CMD commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I noted this line from the Wikipedia entry for the Windover site: "The DNA indicated Asian origin, similar to that of the four other major haplotypes of Native American peoples, and a relatively rare haplogroup, X". Here is what I suspect. In terms of physical traits, Kennewick Man was at first said to be non-native. Yet, DNA analysis proved he was native, and his nearest relatives were the tribes closest to where his remains were found. I believe this was also the case with the remains of a female found in an underwater cave in Mexico. Did not "look" Indian. I forget the name they gave her. But, DNA said she was in fact native. Current thinking is that physical evolution actually occurred in the Americas after the earliest arrivals. I have posted about these finding and that current thinking before, but it won't be a quick and easy search, though the posts must be in the archaeology section. I suspect the Windover bog remains will be similar to the situation with the other early remains that do not look native. The DNA will say that they are native, The Kennewick remains and others have proven that we cannot go by their physical appearance, because the DNA showed we can't.

              • #10
                Did you read them? The stories discuss North, Central and South America.
                Don’t get me wrong. I don’t care if the Florida bog people were Semitic, Polynesian, or Black. I just don’t care but I would like to know the truth? With the little amount of DNA available it just seems disingenuous to leave out over 150 7000-8000 year old bodies from Florida. Many of them having shrunken but intact brains.

                Just saying?

                Von

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by Von View Post
                  Did you read them? The stories discuss North, Central and South America.
                  Don’t get me wrong. I don’t care if the Florida bog people were Semitic, Polynesian, or Black. I just don’t care but I would like to know the truth? With the little amount of DNA available it just seems disingenuous to leave out over 150 7000-8000 year old bodies from Florida. Many of them having shrunken but intact brains.

                  Just saying?

                  Von
                  Yes, I did read them, and actually I have about 6 other articles addressing both studies that I have been thinking of posting under a separate heading. You would have to ask the authors, of course. You say disingenuous, so I'm not sure if you are suggesting a reason for why Windover was not included, by using that term. Obviously, I was not one of the authors, so I cannot really answer you. I doubt the reason would be, for example, "let's leave Windover out, they are controversial or will upset our bias". I highly doubt that, but, otherwise, I don't know the answer. My bad if I thought you were bringing up the theories that the Windover bog bodies were not Native American. I was thinking of a thread, which promoted just that belief, and which Tom had contributed to, and which I think was posted a few months(?) ago. So, my bad if I thought that is why you had brought up Windover. I do not think their reasoning was disingenuous, simply because I do not know the authors and why they selected the samples they selected. So I am not in a position to judge them as disingenuous. With more info, maybe I could. But again, you will need to contact the authors and address your concerns with them. After all, what do I really know?

                  Edit: Von, there is an older thread dealing with the Florida bog site. Since this topic is not about the Florida bog site, and you state above that you just want to know the truth about that site, why not just locate and revive that old thread. Just saying.....

                  Another suggestion. Here is the contact info for the principle excavator of Windover. Perhaps you could ask him why Windover was not included in the sample of either of these two studies. I'm sure his take would be far more informative then anything I could provide, and it seems very likely he will have heard of these studies by now:

                  https://anthro.fsu.edu/faculty/emeri.../dr-glen-doran
                  Last edited by CMD; 11-12-2018, 08:42 PM.

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                  • #12
                    Anyway, some more articles involving the two studies. I'm no geneticist, and I find genetics a tough slog to boot. But, the emphasis does seem to be what these studies have to say regarding the settlement of Central and South America:

                    http://www.tunisiesoir.com/health/st...ls-10014-2018/

                    https://qz.com/1458712/newly-discove...ntral-america/

                    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...rica-populated
                    Last edited by CMD; 11-12-2018, 08:13 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I feel that most folks who write about this subject are biased and that’s why I used the word disingenuous. The lack of viable ancient DNA is obvious. In North America you have the Clovis child mummy, Kennewick man, fossilized terds in a cave that I think is in California and the Florida bog mummies. I think I read about a Indian child found in Canada too? Anyway there’s not that much and I’m not going to take a story seriously if it’s not written in a comprehensive way.

                      South and Central America are a bit different because there are more mummies in the high deserts and flooded sink holes like the one the young woman was found in.

                      It would be interesting if the DNA of some of the Indians that were taken back to Spain could be studied and compared to the bog mummies in Florida.

                      Von

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                      • #14
                        Regarding the first study referenced in this thread. The title was "Reconstructing the Deep Population History of Central and South America".

                        The abstract states:

                        We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 49 individuals forming four parallel time transects in Belize, Brazil, the Central Andes, and the Southern Cone, each dating to at least ∼9,000 years ago. The common ancestral population radiated rapidly from just one of the two early branches that contributed to Native Americans today. We document two previously unappreciated streams of gene flow between North and South America. One affected the Central Andes by ∼4,200 years ago, while the other explains an affinity between the oldest North American genome associated with the Clovis culture and the oldest Central and South Americans from Chile, Brazil, and Belize. However, this was not the primary source for later South Americans, as the other ancient individuals derive from lineages without specific affinity to the Clovis-associated genome, suggesting a population replacement that began at least 9,000 years ago and was followed by substantial population continuity in multiple regions.


                        The two lead authors are Cosimo Posth and Nathan Nakatsuka.

                        Here is the contact info for Posth. The email addy will look incomplete, but if one clicks on it, it will compose an email:

                        https://www.shh.mpg.de/person/47597


                        Here is the contact info for Nakatsuka:

                        https://reich.hms.harvard.edu/node/52


                        I imagine contact info can be easily obtained for the dozens of other authors of this study. One thing I would suggest, if contacting any of the authors to question them on any aspect of the study is to wait a bit. I say that because I can imagine they may be inundated with congratulatory emails for awhile.

                        Hope this helps....

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