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  • #46
    Wonderfully funny, Roger :laugh:  :laugh: Thank you for that.
    Rhode Island

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    • #47
      [QUOTE]cgode wrote:

      [quote=CMD post=50311][quote=cgode post=50310]
      Originally posted by Bill post=50307
       
      Oh and again just for you, that book you should read is Across Atlantic Ice way to go man I am loving it.
      Oh man, thanks Bill.....I had forgotten which book it was! :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:
        Chris, I'm busy writing a new book myself! The tentative title will be "Psychological Projection as Manifested in Archaeological Arguments." Not that catchy, I know, but I'm finding a ton of material on the subject :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:
        :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  I want a signed copy Charlie!!
        Me too, me too!!!!! Should be an interesting read
      And Roger, I'll take six copies, once I read all the facts and become a true believer, I want to make sure all of my friends become aware as well.
      Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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      • #48
        painshill wrote:

        Just to even up the score a bit and emphasise that Stanford and Bradley don’t have the only view. This chart gives some insight into entry routes of Palaeo-Indians from Beringia based on the observed age and distribution of the rare haplogroup C4c and its relationship to haplogroup X2a. It’s from:
        Mitochondrial Haplogroup C4c: A Rare Lineage Entering America Through the Ice-Free Corridor? - Kashani, Perego, Olivieri, Angerhofer, Gandini, Carossa, Lancioni, Semino, Woodward, Achilli -and- Torroni [Am J Phys Anthropol 147:35–39, 2012]

        For which the abstract reads (with my emphasis in bold):
        “Recent analyses of mitochondrial genomes from Native Americans have brought the overall number of recognized maternal founding lineages from just four to a current count of 15. However, because of their relative low frequency, almost nothing is known for some of these lineages. This leaves a considerable void in understanding the events that led to the colonization of the Americas following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In this study, we identified and completely sequenced 14 mitochondrial DNAs belonging to one extremely rare Native American lineage known as haplogroup C4c. Its age and geographical distribution raise the possibility that C4c marked the Paleo-Indian group(s) that entered North America from Beringia through the ice-free corridor between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets.The similarities in ages and geographical distributions for C4c and the previously analyzed X2a lineage provide support to the scenario of a dual origin for Paleo-Indians. Taking into account that C4c is deeply rooted in the Asian portion of the mtDNA phylogeny and is indubitably of Asian origin, the finding that C4c and X2a are characterized by parallel genetic histories definitively dismisses the controversial hypothesis of an Atlantic glacial entry route into North America.”
        (Charlie: thanks for your original post)
        Thanks for this abstract, Roger. I see the paper was published this year. It will be interesting to see how Stanford and/or Bradley respond to this and what effect it will have on the fate of their theory.
        Rhode Island

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        • #49
          :unsure: Whew! This has worn me out........I'm gonna wait for the movie !

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          • #50
            Butch Wilson wrote:

            :unsure: Whew! This has worn me out........I'm gonna wait for the movie !
               :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol: Great balls of fire!  We're in agreement!

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            • #51
              I watched a TED Talks episode last night and did you all know we can create glowing chickens now? Totally blew my mind! The next episode talked about  the DNA work scientist have been doing on how the earth was populated by ancient man/woman. Now that is a cool puzzle to be working on! But as with anything you research that has come from the past you are always looking for and finding more clues!
              This music group comes to mind all of a sudden, Pink Floyd
              And I hear another voice in my head, Oh its my high school psychology teacher saying: "to each their own".
              Thanks for the link! Sandy

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              • #52
                Dandielyonwine wrote:

                I watched a TED Talks episode last night and did you all know we can create glowing chickens now? Totally blew my mind! The next episode talked about  the DNA work scientist have been doing on how the earth was populated by ancient man/woman. Now that is a cool puzzle to be working on! But as with anything you research that has come from the past you are always looking for and finding more clues!
                This music group comes to mind all of a sudden, Pink Floyd
                And I hear another voice in my head, Oh its my high school psychology teacher saying: "to each their own".
                Thanks for the link! Sandy
                Well put Sandy and understand your musical reference
                Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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                • #53
                  Butch Wilson wrote:

                  :unsure: Whew! This has worn me out........I'm gonna wait for the movie !
                  I've seen the tentative script: "Eva, sultry Spanish Solutrean seductress, and Adame, scorned by the hunting parties for his peculiar habit of fluting his weapon tips('Hey Adame, maybe they'll work on mice! Ha HA HA HA') set off westward on a journey of discovery. They are never heard from again, but their adventure has just begun." Arnold Schwarzenegger in the role of Adame. Casting call still ongoing for the role of Eva. To be shot on location in Spain and the Delmarva peninsula.
                  Rhode Island

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                  • #54
                    Why wait until later CMD because I have the answer now!
                    Mitochondrial Haplogroup C4c: A Rare Lineage Entering America Through the Ice-Free Corridor? - Kashani, Perego, Olivieri, Angerhofer, Gandini, Carossa, Lancioni, Semino, Woodward, Achilli -and- Torroni [Am J Phys Anthropol 147:35–39, 2012]
                    “When assessing the geographical distribution of uncommon mtDNA haplogroups such as C4c and X2a, which arrived in the Americas at the very early stages of the human colonization, inevitably a question arises: to which extent might their current distribution still reflect the ancestral migration route(s)? Native American groups have undergone expansions and extinctions both prior and after the arrival of Europeans.
                    Moreover, mtDNA is particularly prone to genetic drift, especially in tribal populations, thus one or even more mtDNA haplogroups can be easily lost in Native American groups (Torroni et al.,1994). Therefore, we cannot dismiss the possibility, for instance, that haplogroup C4c had a geographical distribution wider than that observed in modern populations. This would explain the presence of the highly divergent C4c sequence n. 16 (Fig. 1) in Colombia. Such a scenario would also imply, if the parallelism between haplogroups C4c and X2a holds, that X2a might also have been more widespread than currently observed, as possibly suggested by an early, not further documented ancient DNA evidence (7-8,000 years before present) from the Windover site, in the central coastal region of Florida (Hauswirth et al.,1994). Obviously, a fundamental contribution to the resolution of this issue can be provided only by extensive ancient DNA studies performed all over the Americas.”
                    Bill sez the Molecular Archaeology DNA data cannot eliminate the possibility of A Solutrean immigration into Northeastern North America that may not show up in the Haplotypes. B)
                    The artifacts say yes and the DNA data is clearly not definitive. B)  B)

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                    • #55
                      Bill, thank you for posting the response by Stanford/Bradley.
                      Rhode Island

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                      • #56
                        Here is a video, about 45 minutes total, in 5 parts, computer narrated, and offering a rebuttal of the Solutrean hypothesis.
                        Part 1:
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDScxPObgBw
                        Part 2:
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&fe...&v=2mqYfmB9Svs
                        Rhode Island

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                        • #57
                          Part 3:
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&fe...&v=t4Mxi-wKduo
                          Part 4:
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=ghEkE4IZxnI
                          Rhode Island

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                          • #58
                            And Part 5:
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&fe...&v=xZru2KQxubI
                            Rhode Island

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                            • #59
                              Thanks CMD, I saw those when I was getting the Mitochondrial DNA article that you posted earlier. Thanks for posting those, I'll check em out and get back to ya.
                              The problem with the DNA data is that it has always been inconclusive. DNA is fragle and is only well preserved only under special circumstances. Because of this fact there are, have been, and always may be gaps in recovered DNA that are wide enough to drive a huge truck through and this causes it have simply miss or leave out quite a bit.
                              It is looking some parts and trying to reconstruct a picture from those parts. It just may inaccurate and not look like the original!

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                              • #60
                                Actually it was my response but I'll take that as a compliment B)  B)

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