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  • How did this get there?


    https://gizmodo.com/mammoth-tusk-fou...uns-1848111748
    Last edited by gregszybala; 11-24-2021, 06:37 AM.
    Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

  • #2
    Very cool. I’m going with the bloated and floated theory. Those ocean currents can carry something a loooong way. A big dead bloated mammoth would have stayed buoyant for awhile I would guess. Unless popped by some big sea predators of course.
    Uncle Trav- Southwest Michigan

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    • #3
      I’m goin with the wizard of oz theory,
      Floridaboy.

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      • #4
        That far out? I'd go with bloating as well. But, elephants are known to get caught in rivers and swept out to sea pretty regularly in Asia.

        This was one story, but I vaguely remember reading about them further out and one of the ships making the difficult decision to put them down because they couldn't be rescued.

        Wild elephants brought ashore after rescue involving navy divers, ropes and flotilla of boats to tow them
        Hong Kong, but from Indiana/Florida

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        • #5
          9 miles out to sea:

          https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...outputType=amp
          Hong Kong, but from Indiana/Florida

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          • Cecilia
            Cecilia commented
            Editing a comment
            👏
            Clearly, if happened modern elephant now, musta happened many, many times over eons….

            Alternative theory to currents sweeping out and away, maybe great prehistoric fish grabbed deluxe dinner, dropped tusk toothpick on way open seas!
            Last edited by Cecilia; 11-28-2021, 05:40 AM.

        • #6
          also back then sea levels were a lot lower and the continental shelf was exposed
          Wyoming

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          • #7
            Depth probably helped preserve it. It could have bloated and floated. Less than two hundred miles isn't that far. Maybe a little less with shoreline change since then. Another possibility is that it was somebody's cargo and got dropped overboard.
            California

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            • #8
              Apparently, mammoths often went swimming. You can usually tell that from their trunks.
              I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

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              • clovisoid
                clovisoid commented
                Editing a comment
                Well played, a classic!

              • Cecilia
                Cecilia commented
                Editing a comment
                If not for prehensile snorkel attached to face, Sri Lankan elephant drowned
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