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Help in Identifying Spearhead

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  • Help in Identifying Spearhead

    This is the largest Spearhead that I have in my collection. It measures 10" in length. It probably came from West Texas or Central Texas. I would be interested in identifying it, its history, approximate value and age.
    Most of my collection is from west Texas. Thank you, Danny

  • #2
    Danny, although you seem uncertain of its locale, was this a personal find? Some close up photos in natural light would help, but please be advised we do not provide value estimates. That's not why we're here.
    Welcome to AH.com. We'd like to hear more about your collection.
    Child of the tides

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    • #3
      Those are way out of my area and i hunt for rocks and have only bought a few. I have been lucky to find a good deal of perfect to nearly perfect specimens, but from what I can tell in the pic I am leaning to some modern pieces. that assumtion is from very little detail in the pic and is in no way meant to be offensive. Better pics of individual points would help.

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      • #4
        When (or if!) you have ONE fake in a collection, the whole collection is tainted. That bottom left point for example don't look right.
        Last edited by tomclark; 11-04-2017, 06:25 AM. Reason: Photo authentication rarely works.....
        Professor Shellman

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        • #5
          When would you like to meet to examine them??? Bring all the experts you want!! No fakes here!! YES, ONE FAKE IN THE BUNCH TAINT'S IT!

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          • #6
            You need to provide better quality pictures if you want us to provide an opinion about what you have. You also need to provide more info about each point that you ask about. I agree with Tom that the one on the bottom left looks like a modern reproduction. I don't agree with him that one reproduction taints a collection. Many people buy modern pieces knowing full well that they are not real prehistoric artifacts. Regarding the large point: As I said, you gotta get us some decent pictures. Regarding valuation. We don't do that here. You need to contact dealers for that. Plenty of them advertise on this website.

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            • #7
              Thank you. I've attached hopefully a better picture (both sides) of the spear head. I am primarily interested in any information on this item. It may have come from our farm in Terry County (Brownfield) Texas since the dirt on it was similar to that on our farm. Ive also included a pic of the majority of my arrowhead collection. All have been hidden for the past 50 years until we recently discovered them in a basement on our farm.

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              • #8
                You've got a great collection of a wide variety of points that seem to represent a wide range of times. No way to ID so many points at once. The large point is indeed a super piece but sorry that I can't provide much besides that as I'm not from your area. They look like some Texas points for sure. The corner tang knife that I see is also a real beauty as are many others.

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                • #9
                  I appreciate your help and will begin to study and research these. This is about 1/2 of the collection. My grandfather was quite a collector and this was one of his passions. As he developed new farms from previously undeveloped land he located these, as well as some other items. Ive attached some pics of items that ive shipped that he found, hoping that they will be displayed in a museum, etc. for others to appreciate the history behind it. Thanks, Danny

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                  • #10
                    If you did not find it yourself in context with other artifacts there is simply no way of knowing for sure. If you want good honest answers on what you have there I suggest contacting Dwain Rogers or one of the top authenticators out there. Dickey in Tennessee. Bennett in Ohio to name a few. . If you do have authentic Texas pieces there some of them are well worth getting papered. I give this advice especially if you did not find them personally. If it turns out there are reproductions in there That is cool you have an heirloom seperate it from the good, keep it, cherish it, label it exactly what it is so future generation do not just assume they are made by paleo man. I suggest you find out exactly what you have from local experts to your area.

                    Posting points like yours to a internet forum usually will draw criticism so be aware you need to have a thick skin. Try not to be defensive to any criticism because you are new here, we don't know you from Adam. You might not want to meet some of us in person! You might? However calling someone out because of a comment on the internet before actually having a face to face is certainly not a good idea. Many of us here have seen so many modern pieces posted with grand pa's story we could write a book. If you took that Book's pages and laid them side by side one by one, edge to edge it would create a list that would go around the world twice.

                    In my honest opinion you have some modern reproduction pieces in your first picture. I could be wrong it is difficult to say for sure from pictures. You are far better off showing these to an experienced authenticator from Texas.

                    About donating to Museums because you mentioned that did you know that museums do not even care about artifacts that have zero Provenience? They want artifacts for study but they need to know things first. Who found it? When and where? They want specifics about it's in situ position and what was found in context. If those basics are not met they view the items as simple trinkets. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/provenience

                    It is commendable to donate however what you give may never show up in a museum showcase.

                    Welcome to arrowheads.com
                    ​​​​​​​
                    TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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                    • #11
                      Thank you. I believe you are right, and it would be best for me to contact an authenticator to determine what pieces are what (labelled and inventoried) and gain more knowledge before doing anything.

                      I appreciate your advice.



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                      • Hoss
                        Hoss commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Stick around and read up on some of the information we have available and ask questions we try and help other collectors here. We have people who have collected for years and people who are just starting out. Even those of us who have been at it for years have a lot to learn. This hobby will never cease to amaze you. The more I learn from it the more I realize the less I know about it.

                    • #12
                      I do not think Dwain has email but here is contact info for him.
                      Texas Flint Authentication
                      Dwain Rogers
                      4102 Birch Blvd.
                      Temple, TX 76502
                      (254) 791-5520
                      TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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                      • #13
                        Good advice Hoss!

                        Nice collection Dridd, its easy for a few repros or fakes to slip into an old collection (or a new one)... It happens.
                        Last edited by Kyflintguy; 11-05-2017, 05:46 PM.
                        Josh (Ky/Tn collector)

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                        • #14
                          Thanks, guys. Temple is not too far away from me, so I'll contact him.

                          I am not after personal gain, just knowledge and advice. Not sure why fakes are out there, wouldn't they be difficult to reproduce? But, in our times, guess it could.

                          Again ,Thank you.

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                          • #15
                            Modern knappers make them and sell them in honest ways. Some even sign their work. Then someone unscrupulous will buy them have them papered by a bad paper writer who will paper anything for money and resell them for big profits. It is ruining the hobby. Knapping itself is not a bad thing it is a great hobby and I encourage people to try it. It is not for everyone as it is hard work. You would be surprised there are thousands of people out there doing it every day as a hobby. If sold as Modern art or as a modern reproduction of a primitive weapon for study purposes it is a great thing as it adds to the education of the items. It is when the greedy dealer who is just in it for a buck gets a hold of it is when it hurts our hobby. We have a section here for Knappers and we have several very talented knappers who make posts here. All honest people who do this to educate and to create modern art using primitive techniques
                            TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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