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Fossil/s or conglomerate of shells?

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  • Fossil/s or conglomerate of shells?

    Found this Saturday morning, I'm not sure what all it is. About 2 1/2" X 1", Photo's rotated to show four sides.

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    Last edited by gregszybala; 03-25-2020, 04:36 PM.
    Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

  • #2
    That would make a nice display piece, Greg. It's almost 'sculptural' in an artistic sense.

    I would put it in the territory of "coquinite".

    https://geology.com/rocks/coquina.shtml
    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

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    • gregszybala
      gregszybala commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Roger, I'm pretty clueless as is but when it comes to fossils in NW Indiana, totally.

  • #3
    That thing is mad cool ..congrats on the find

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    • #4
      Nice, Greg!
      Rhode Island

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      • #5
        I can see some pretty clear tube structures in your second and third pictures. Maybe this part of a silicified colony of tubular coral held together with silt? One of my fossil books says Cass, White, and Carol counties in Indiana have quite a few marine examples. Apparently, the whole northern part of the state is one big fossilized sea reef.
        Last edited by Cecilia; 03-26-2020, 07:06 AM.

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        • #6
          Ah ha! I think you may have fossilized calcium carbonate tubes made by marine worm “serpulid”.


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          • tomclark
            tomclark commented
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            I believe you nailed it! Boom!

          • gregszybala
            gregszybala commented
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            Thank you!

        • #7
          In with those serpulid worm tubes I think there are also some Turritellids/ Vermitellids gastropod tubes in the mix? Maybe see at least one septal wall (broken half dome)
          Professor Shellman

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          • Cecilia
            Cecilia commented
            Editing a comment
            Hey, I know a little coral, a little Bryozoa, a coupla worms....But since you are NeptuneTom, and though I’m not a mermaid, I am your avid student, so learning ‘bout Vermitellids and Turritellids NOW! Hold that Q....

          • Cecilia
            Cecilia commented
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            I did look at fossilized vermitellids, and turritellids earlier (I’m good with pictures, bad with names), as well as some tubuliporata, cephalopods, sphenothallus, cyclostome, lophophyllidion, and a buncha other plants, animals, and minerals! Mostly, I compared everybody’s tubes. For now, this minute, I think yes as to vermitellids, but no as to turritellids.... I’m not done a-pondering, tho.....
            Last edited by Cecilia; 03-26-2020, 12:37 PM.

          • gregszybala
            gregszybala commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you!

        • #8
          Thanks you two! As a clueless fossil guy who has only found his second one in NW Indiana this is quite cool and educational.
          Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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          • #9
            Y’all should see example of Tom’s suggested consideration, Vermitellids, a sea snail, because it does indeed resemble my response of Supulids, a sea worm. In fact, in subsequent reading, even geologists say only way can tell them apart is to look inside the tubes. The snails’ tubes are shiny, whereas the worms’ are dull inside. Originally, when I looked at this picture, I couldn’t see any vertical bead-like ridges like those appearing Greg’s pictures, but I think it’s just the lighting doesn’t show them.


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