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White smooth Bipoint

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  • White smooth Bipoint

    I don't think I have seen this material before. The point is so white that it was difficult to get a picture. I had to mess with the lighting to show some detail. I don't see any lines in the material except for a hairline crack. I don't see any grains in the material. The thing doesn't feel like any stone I am familiar with.










    Michigan Yooper
    If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

  • #2
    Is that from out west ? If it feels waxy it might be chalcedony .

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    • #3
      Thanks Dennis, Southern Colorado, Huerfano County, near LaVeta on Bear Creek.
      Yes it does feel waxy.
      Michigan Yooper
      If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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      • #4
        beautiful !!!
        call me Jay, i live in R.I.

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        • #5
          I really did not know what chalcedony is so I decided to see what the USGS had to say on the subject.
          Surely the USGS would clear it up for me... Or maybe not. This is from the USGS:
          Chalcedony
          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Chalcedony is a catch all term that includes many well known varieties of cryptocrystalline quartz gemstones. They are found in all 50 States, in many colors and color combinations, and in sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. Chalcedony includes carnelian, sard, plasma, prase, bloodstone, onyx, sardonyx, chrysoprase, thundereggs, agate, flint, chert, jasper, petrified wood, and petrified dinosaur bone just to name a few of the better known varieties.
          http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pu...halcedony.html
          Michigan Yooper
          If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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          • #6
            A most important point about most knappable and preferable materials...... all cryptocrystalline quartz of some variety.
            Professor Shellman
            Tampa Bay

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            • #7
              tomclark wrote:

              A most important point about most knappable and preferable materials...... all cryptocrystalline quartz of some variety.
              I believe you missed my point. My point was this: Don't make me out to be a Fool.
              Michigan Yooper
              If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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              • #8
                Perhaps the right person simply has not seen this post yet.
                Does anyone have any idea what this lithic material is?
                Michigan Yooper
                If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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                • #9
                  soap!its carved outta soap! just kidding bud,from what ive seen it does look like chalcedony to me as well,but then again,i really have no idea.wish i could help man! maybe try sending a message to painshill?
                  call me Jay, i live in R.I.

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                  • #10
                    Yes It is definitely made of ROCK:
                    I was hoping that someone could be a little more specific.
                    Michigan Yooper
                    If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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                    • #11
                      Its Chalcedony it comes in all colors but has a waxy feel we find out west all the time .

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                      • #12
                        Here's a little bird point made of chalcedony .

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                        • #13
                          Chalcedony
                            Chalcedony is a catch all term that includes many well known varieties of cryptocrystalline quartz gemstones. They are found in all 50 States, in many colors and color combinations, and in sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. Chalcedony includes carnelian, sard, plasma, prase, bloodstone, onyx, sardonyx, chrysoprase, thundereggs, agate, flint, chert, jasper, petrified wood, and petrified dinosaur bone just to name a few of the better known varieties.
                          minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodit...4-95/chalcedony.html
                          Michigan Yooper
                          If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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                          • #14
                            So is your point chalcedony ? We call any material that feels waxy chalcedony . Chalcedony is a very hard material. It has a hardness of 7 on the Mohs scale. It breaks with a conchoidal fracture, and freshly broken pieces have a very smooth, non-granular texture and a waxy to vitreous luster. These characteristics enable chalcedony to be cut and polished into a bright, durable gemstone.
                            Chalcedony occurs in a wide range of colors. It is often gray, white, brown, red, yellow, orange and black, but it can occur in any color. It can also be banded or have plume, dendritic, mottled, mossy or other color patterns. At one time the word “chalcedony” was reserved in parts of the gemstone industry for a light blue translucent material; however, this use of the word has nearly disappeared.

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                            • #15
                              Ron Kelley wrote:

                              Chalcedony
                                Chalcedony is a catch all term that includes many well known varieties of cryptocrystalline quartz gemstones. They are found in all 50 States, in many colors and color combinations, and in sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. Chalcedony includes carnelian, sard, plasma, prase, bloodstone, onyx, sardonyx, chrysoprase, thundereggs, agate, flint, chert, jasper, petrified wood, and petrified dinosaur bone just to name a few of the better known varieties.
                              minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodit...4-95/chalcedony.html
                                Ron, page returned an error message. I believe your point is how can all these things listed be chalcedony? It does seem a tad odd :huh: and definitely one for Roger!
                              Rhode Island

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