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  • Flaked Slate

    Both of these are from Bristol Co MA. Chipped slate. Comments welcome. Click image for larger version

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    TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

  • #2
    The larger Grey slate one is just under 5 inches long. I am perplexed as to type on that critter. Been playing with my Camera. FYI Last year I bought a Canon T5I and I have just not played around with it enough to really get to know the ins and outs of the camera. These are good but a camera like this can do better in my opinion. Chalking it up to user error for now. LOL Or maybe I am just too hard on myself.
    Last edited by Hoss; 01-24-2016, 05:54 PM.
    TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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    • #3
      I think your pics are good. My wife has a good camera and I'm getting ready to try and get good at its macro mode.

      Those points are awesome. I wonder how sharp an edge slate keeps? Was it necessity because there was limited lithics or did they like slate points? Only other ones Ive seen were ground.
      Last edited by OBION; 01-24-2016, 08:31 PM.

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      • #4
        I'm no knapper but it looks like a different approach or method would have to be used to flake slate. I would think it would be hard to get a really sharp edge and keep flakes from coming off as not intended.
        Thanks Matt.
        Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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        • OnewiththewilD
          OnewiththewilD commented
          Editing a comment
          its not easy Greg! im amazed by the quality of the work i sometimes see in artifacts made from it.the material is kinda erratic and flakes terribly most times, sometimes it hinges off easy or splits in half like you think slate would, other times its a nice solid material that just happens to be some what knappable,lol. i dont know whats worse or harder to knapp, this argillite or our local quartz, either way id hate to try and make a living with em"!

      • #5
        Was thinkinking the same thing , lack of lithic ..
        I really prize the odd ball stuff whether they r valuable or not , thanks Matt
        As for me and my house , we will serve the lord

        Everett Williams ,
        NW Arkansas

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        • #6
          The second most common lithic in Southeastern New England is argillaceous slate. But it's called argillite by professional and amateur alike. This causes confusion when folks from south of this region say "that does not look like argillite". Well, that's because NJ argillite is argillaceous shale. This stuff, which we in New England will always call argillite, closely resembles slate from the slate belt in the Southeast. The last point, seen in the last two photos, is unifacial and made off a flake. Now, many of these are also water worn, so keep that in mind. It seems likely these would be considered slate points if found in the so-called slate belt. So, maybe these qualify. I could show you hundreds of these. Quartz is our most common lithic. But argillite, i.e. argillaceous slate, is not too far behind. These almost always patinate greenish to blueish-grey. Fresh surfaces are jet black.....
          Rhode Island

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          • OBION
            OBION commented
            Editing a comment
            I love that top point in the third pic, what is its type?

          • CMD
            CMD commented
            Editing a comment
            That's a Late Archaic Vosburg,

          • Hoss
            Hoss commented
            Editing a comment
            Obion I agree with you that s a nice point. Sweet Vosburg Charl. All of those examples are really nice artifacts. Thanks for sharing the information.

        • #7
          Matt, using Boudreau's description, your larger point is a Merrimack. A minority have slightly expanding stems as seen in your example. That 's my best guess as to type. It looks the type and is clearly in the Narrow Point Tradition of the Northeast.
          Rhode Island

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          • #8
            Thanks for the comments Charlie. I was leaning toward Merrimac myself. I was just not quite sure 100% I have Boudreau's book. I purchased it at your recommendation several years back. I have misplaced it since moving. I know it is in the house but where???


            Charl do you think the grey and red are both argillaceous slates too?
            TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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            • #9
              Originally posted by Hoss View Post
              Thanks for the comments Charlie. I was leaning toward Merrimac myself. I was just not quite sure 100% I have Boudreau's book. I purchased it at your recommendation several years back. I have misplaced it since moving. I know it is in the house but where???


              Charl do you think the grey and red are both argillaceous slates too?
              The longer one might be argillite, but looks like a different source then my examples. I probably should not have posted those, as it can be seen as highjacking, which I did not intend. But that one does look close enough to be argillite, or very closely related. The reddish one might be as well, I think it can occur in that shade at times.
              Rhode Island

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              • #10
                I am happy you posted up some examples Charlie. Learn something new every day. This one here is Argillite and come from MA too. Not the greatest picture but the impact fracture stood out on this side so I decided to share this picture. Click image for larger version

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                Last edited by Hoss; 01-26-2016, 05:07 PM.
                TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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                • #11
                  I read the title as Faked Slate, and then wondered what the heck was going on... Time for another cup of coffee.

                  Nice points.
                  Hong Kong, but from Indiana/Florida

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                  • #12
                    Charlie, would you type that first triangular point as a Hardaway Dalton? That's a great point.

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                    • #13
                      Originally posted by clambellies View Post
                      Charlie, would you type that first triangular point as a Hardaway Dalton? That's a great point.
                      It did come from the site that yielded a Hardaway Side Notch, as confirmed by Boudreau. Also one or more possible Hardaway Dalton's as described by some Northeastern archy's, including Boudreau. With allowances for how different they really are from the type specimens found in North Carolina. We need an original name for our Hardaway's and Hardaway Dalton's, but none found in context here as yet, so some borrow those southern names for our points, despite the confusion it does cause.

                      So, to answer your question, I think the triangle you refer to is early. And I keep it framed with other possible early points from that site. It's a hunch on my part, which our friend Bill agrees with. I don't know if I could call it a New England Hardaway Dalton, as I have seen some from southern New England that very much closely resemble their southern namesakes more then this one does. Having said, that, it might be one, and I do think it is otherwise Early Archaic, and not a later triangle.
                      Rhode Island

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                      • #14
                        Originally posted by clambellies View Post
                        Charlie, would you type that first triangular point as a Hardaway Dalton? That's a great point.
                        Alan, it also always reminded me of an Alamance, a Late Paleo triangular style from the Mid Atlantic. And the site where found has given up other seemingly southern types. Almost looks like flute-like thinning on one side...
                        Rhode Island

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                        • #15
                          Very interesting point. I have something sort of like that, Bill M. thought it was a Hardaway dalton. I have a few problematical points that are hard to pin down.

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