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  • Carolina Rhyolite

    Here is a example of North Carolina Rhyolite, differing patinas different "look"!

    Exposed to the weather for a long period it can patina almost white !

    Butch

  • #2
    Butch
    Nice collection. Like that balck -and- white.
    Jack

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    • #3
      Butch, Nice points and thanks for the examples. Rhyolite ever come in a reddish brown? Found a point here in Northwest Indiana and have wondered about the material. Know it is not chert, but what it is?

      Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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      • #4
        gregszybala wrote:

        Butch, Nice points and thanks for the examples. Rhyolite ever come in a reddish brown? Found a point here in Northwest Indiana and have wondered about the material. Know it is not chert, but what it is?
        http://geology.about.com/od/rocks/ig...icrhyolite.htm

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        • #5
          Charlie told me this piece is called Attleboro Red Felsite similar to yours Greg

          TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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          • #6
            So obviously not even close Butch, but does look like yours Hoss. Traveled quite a bit to get here.
            Thanks gents.
            Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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            • #7
              gregszybala wrote:

              So obviously not even close Butch, but does look like yours Hoss. Traveled quite a bit to get here.
              Thanks gents.
                Yours is a bit lighter in color than mine it looks very similar though. What do you call the type there? Would you say a Kirk?
              My apologies to you Butch those are some fine looking Rhyolite points there. And that is what this thhread started with. Thanks for sharing.
              TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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              • #8
                nice points Greg and Hoss, kinda grainy. Hoss, isn't felsite the same make up as Rhyolite just larger grain structure?
                Butch

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                • #9
                  Here is a source for Rhyolite about 40 miles from my property !
                  http://www.archaeology.ncdcr.gov/uwh...morrowmtn.html
                  Butch

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                  • #10
                    Butch Wilson wrote:

                    nice points Greg and Hoss, kinda grainy. Hoss, isn't felsite the same make up as Rhyolite just larger grain structure?
                    Butch
                      I agree Butch there are three types of Rhyolitic rocks which are stages in crystalline development The felsitic or cryptocrystalline, and the microcrystalline. I think it is all Rhyolite but if the geologists from Massachusetts decided on Attelboro Red Felisite for that part of the lava flow in that part of the country then so be it! LOL I am sure that greg's is a Felisite too I posted mine just to show that a volcanic tuff can also come in red or pink.   :woohoo:  :laugh:  :cheer:    :whistle:
                    TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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                    • #11
                      Thanks again you two, very informative, didn't mean to jump your post Butch, but really thought it was a similar material, appreciate the info.
                      I'm leaning more toward a Brewerton, but I'm still learning.
                      Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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                      • #12
                        Greg, forums are designed to encourage participation, for that I thank you and Hoss ! I posted this because patination on Rhyolite is dramatic taking the material from black to white with everything in between.
                        Butch

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                        • #13
                          A few quartz pieces in here, but mostly rhyolite. All are personal finds from NC from the good old days.

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                          • #14
                            CliffJ wrote:

                            A few quartz pieces in here, but mostly rhyolite. All are personal finds from NC from the good old days.
                              Wow Cliff, nice examples. That little collection says North Carolina for sure! Question for you, on the points I posted, the dark point on the left in my first photo. Could that be a heavily resharpened Kirk?
                            Butch

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for starting this thread, Butch.
                              Identifying the Rhyolites of NC can get real complicated real quick. There are hundreds of different
                              varieties of Rhyolite in our state, but the term Rhyolite is also used as a generic catch-all term
                              for a lot of the meta-sedimentary materials we also have. Sometimes you can't really say for sure
                              what the material is without seeing it in-situ, or the outcrop it came from.
                              For instance that beauty of a fluted point, right center, in Cliffs picture of points found from
                              the good ol'days. (Amen to that, Cliff!) Might be Rhyolite or a Felsite?
                              The dark point on the left of the points you pictured I would call a Rowan, but the lack of
                              patina is curious. It must have an extremely high silica content.
                              The pink point Greg posted found in northwest Indiana(?) might be a Felsite, but due to the lack of
                              volcanic materials available in that region, I would guess a sedimentary silicated sandstone,
                              or even a quartzite, first.
                              Nice link to the fieldtrip to Morrow Mountain with Dr. Daniel. As mentioned, Morrow Mountain is
                              known for its flow-banded rhyolite while the porphyritic stuff, what several of the points you
                              pictured are made of, can be found one mountain over and several other places in the Slate belt.
                              The most recent and thorough work on trying to identify the different types of Rhyolite in NC was
                              published by the Research Laboratories of Archaeology at Chapel Hill in conjunction with work being
                              done by the archaeology team at Fort Bragg. It is called "Stone Quarries and Sourcing in the
                              Carolina Slate Belt", 2006.
                              This is a good topic on an interesting lithic, but can get complicated and, as I said, sometimes
                              questions can only be answered by seeing where the rock came from in the ground and its surroundings.
                              Real Fun Stuff!
                              Joe

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