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  • #16
    Wyandotte, KY Blue, Sonora, St. Genevieve are all in the Hornstone family... They range from glassy to very dull luster's and come in various shades of grey, blues, browns and everything in between... The Hornstone your showing in the photo is not translucent like your piece, I have knapped quite a bit of it. The lighter area is like chalk toward the outer edges and hardens towards the center cherty part of the nodule but does not look like your material.

    Here's my experience with pinning down lithic materials Ethan, I've been collecting Kentucky lithics for a while now. I've found that some stuff can be identified pretty readily. Hornstone, Boyle, Sonora, Carter cave (Paoli), Harrodsburg, Breathit, Pulaski, Ft. Payne etc, etc... I personally think your overlooking a prime canidate in Haney, But many lithics are just not known or named also. You get glacial erratics, various nodular cherts that can be indigenous to only geologically small areas and imported lithics that may be overlooked completely. You get stuff that patinates so much there is no telling what it is!

    The amount of information regarding lithics online is extremely limited and good photo resources are even rarer. Believe it or not most archaeogist can't associate a definitive Chert type to many artifacts... It's a field where a lot of work is yet to be done. Your still young, maybe you should go to school and specialize in identifying lithics sources for collectors and professionals alike!

    ​​​​​​I say don't bang your head against the wall too hard trying to figure it out is my best advice, you will run into this same issue once you start taking a deep interest into identification of your finds. Sometimes the answer is not readily available, instead of force fitting your find like a square peg in a round hole, set it aside, be ok with not being sure, stay at learning and one day the answer you seek will smack you right in the face when you least expect it. Lol it's happen to me that way a few times!
    Josh (Ky/Tn collector)

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    • Kentucky point
      Kentucky point commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow Josh! You felt like writing a speech did you? I definitely see what you are getting at, and I apologize for my stubbornness and reluctance. I have a tendency to find things and associate as much info as possible to said object. When I found my CS button for instance, I researched as much as I could about the spot that I found it in. I found out a lot of cool things about that place, and now I can tell people what I know. I want to be able to tell folks around here what type my point is, what material it is, where it came from, who made it, and give the history behind it. I believe with 100% positivey that you guys know what you are talking about. You guys are older (no offense), and much wiser than I am right now. But thank you very much for the advice. Like you said, it will hit me one day!

    • Kyflintguy
      Kyflintguy commented
      Editing a comment
      No need to Apologise, I completely understand the urge to want to identify a lithic. I know as you build your collection you will see more lithics like this one that are stubborn with identification. I suggest go find more finds and that will help you get a wider range of what that lithics variances are... It's very likely there is more of it around and I'm sure it takes on a few different grades of quality like many Chert types do and patina can vary wildly depending on environment. But like I said if you keep at learning you will nail down the source eventually.

  • #17
    I am not sure of your location but if you are near the Indiana , west to North Central Kentucky area there is an illinois chert that was sought after. It matches your color and comes in many colors. Mostly blue and grey but is brown to red. I know several spots where it was quarried . The blue seems to be the most sought after. It's referred to as degonia chert. I have several points made of this material from Paleo to woodland. I have no doubt this material was traded far and wide and is likely misnamed as a material. Dover chert and fort payne are very common in my area even though they are two and three states away. So a state or two away in a river valley is not uncommon at all for a material to be found. Some degonia is full of fossils, some is translucent with lil spects in it and some what I refer to as clean. Just a shot in the dark

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    • Kentucky point
      Kentucky point commented
      Editing a comment
      I live on the North Eastern tip of Kentucky bordering the Ohio river, and close to West Virginia. There are not too many good pictures of degonia, but I will keep looking.

  • #18
    This is a good study on the lower Ohio valley. It confirms my own experiences with materials I have found in my hunting.

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    • #19
      Now I do not want an endorsement, or your vote because I am asking, But Find of the Month is going on right now, and I am the only one entered. If you found something this past July, please enter it. I would like to win/lose fair and square against somebody else. I do not like things just handed out to me. I like working for what I want.

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