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Common Material Types Nor CA.

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  • Common Material Types Nor CA.

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    ​​ These are three of the most common material types in my part of Northern California. Obsidian, no news there, basalt and chert. The chert wasn’t as widely used for chipped items as obsidian but I’ve found a good amount of scrapers and choppers as well as a few points and other pieces. Some shown are barely worked while others weren’t worked at all. The basalt items shown are some broken pestles. Of note is the porous type my grandpa used to call ‘lava rock’. The obsidian shown is most likely a cross section of types from the two and possibly a third main glass sites. The scraper is a banded type. Hopefully pics are visible.
    Last edited by Missouri Breaks; 09-20-2021, 07:07 PM. Reason: Hopefully the pictures are there now.

  • #2
    That's some pretty material. Wish we had that out here in the south.

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    • Missouri Breaks
      Missouri Breaks commented
      Editing a comment
      If you ever make the trek out here I’m pretty sure you could get pointed in the right direction to a source where you can find obsidian. There are some public deposits where people go etc.

  • #3
    For some reason I'm seeing any pictures. Anyone know why. Kim
    Knowledge is about how and where to learn more Knowledge that you seek. Snyder County Pa.

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    • Ron Kelley
      Ron Kelley commented
      Editing a comment
      Hey Kim, I don't see the pictures either. Not on your end.

  • #4
    All translucent I’m guessing cause I don’t see them either
    NW Georgia

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    • Missouri Breaks
      Missouri Breaks commented
      Editing a comment
      Are you seeing them now S.H.? I reposted

    • SurfaceHunter
      SurfaceHunter commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes I’m seeing a lot 😁

  • #5
    I’m not sure why the pics aren’t coming through. I see them but had encountered some glitches during the posting process so maybe I messed it up… Admin help 👋?

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    • #6
      No pics, bro.
      California

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    • #7
      Hey Matt, you've got a great variety of material there and it's nice to see some coastal chert as well as so many different obsidians. That swirly stuff is amazing. I haven't seen it out here in Napa. I think the porous 'lava rock' is probably correctly know as rhyolite tuff which is volcanic, like basalt, but has a different texture. I'm not positive though. I think the pestle(?) on right of first hardstone pic is most likely tuff. Other darker, denser pieces may well be basalt.
      California

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      • Missouri Breaks
        Missouri Breaks commented
        Editing a comment
        Yep, certainly seems possible there’d be some tuff in amongst the pieces. What I can say is that it doesn’t seem to be a primary native rock to my main site though. It’s difficult with pictures to ID, but I can take a look at some of the cross sections and compare. A lot of materials were brought into the sites around here. The variations in the chert might indicate the pieces were selected by people who met up with others for trade as if a variety had been chosen. Almost always used as scrapers or multi’s, precious few points or blades, because they preferred obsidian. That little gray stone piece in the foreground might be the top of a charm.

      • tomf
        tomf commented
        Editing a comment
        They imported (and exported) all kinds of materials. At first it would have been exchange of goods, later shell currency was involved. Sometimes groups would travel to source, other times they would trade. Franciscan chert can be found at various places up and down the coast (almost always west of San Andreas fault - to do with subduction of tectonic plate).

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franciscan_Complex

        On the rare occasion I find chert it is Franciscan and, as you say, almost always used for scrapers. Rare exception is Houx point I've shown you (probably the best point I ever found).

    • #8
      Some nice things you have found. I find those small blades here to I hardly ever show them due to the edge work usually won’t show in the pictures. But I have 100s of them in bowls with some crude points and other tools I usually don’t share. Nice show
      NW Georgia

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      • tomf
        tomf commented
        Editing a comment
        Edge work shows very well on obsidian. No doubt the same tool kit is replicated (more or less) in cherts and flint back east.

      • Missouri Breaks
        Missouri Breaks commented
        Editing a comment
        The hide tanning tools won’t have very sharp edge work. Maybe you have some of those.

    • #9
      Fabulous stuff. I pick up the debitage too, and sometimes after further study find it’s a tool.
      North Carolina

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      • Missouri Breaks
        Missouri Breaks commented
        Editing a comment
        It’s an amazing part of the process, to handle material imported to the sites, knowing it was appreciated by the people there. The tools show the thought processes and if we can figure out their uses we learn that much more about daily lives of the people. Hammer stones, choppers, saws etc…

    • #10
      Great finds, great material thanks for the show MB. K
      Knowledge is about how and where to learn more Knowledge that you seek. Snyder County Pa.

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