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Does anyone make and use their own arrows?

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  • Does anyone make and use their own arrows?

    Looking for any advice about materials, straightening etc.

  • #2
    Not sure if they are good for arrows but if you have any cane, or what I like to call north American bamboo, it makes for a great atlatl dart shaft. Some of the smaller sturdier ones may make great arrow shafts also. If you're in western TN I'm sure you can find some in your area. Heating and bending it into shape is one method for cane and I suspect it would work with hardwoods as well. Shaving and sanding a shaft until it is straight is another method. As far as material, hardwoods that have a little give (i.e. maple, ash, or hickory). Of course it helps to start with a stick that is pretty straight to begin with. There are alot of videos on youtube, but I feel trial and error and going off your inherent instinct may be the best teacher.
    On another note, that is a super cool and very beautiful raptor you have there in your avatar. What species is it?
    Stagger Lee/ SE Missouri

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    • #3
      I make mine out of white or red maple saplings. River cane doesn’t grow up here. I cut everything long and shave off the branches and bark and while it’s still green I fire straighten and harden them.
      call me Jay, i live in R.I.

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      • #4
        I have thought about it. Around here river cane and cedar trees are easy enough to find. The biggest problem I see is getting a consistent or even enough spine to handle the draw weight of the recurve bows I have. Then there’s durability of a stone arrowhead to consider. I have several old fiberglass bows in the 30-35 lb range but even those bows are pretty strong and need a fairly stiff spined arrow. If I ever do build some I may shoot them a few times and then use them as a wall hanger.

        Von

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        • #5
          Ok I got time to respond further. My first bit of advice is to look into exactly what the local natives in your area used and learn to identify those materials. Harvest a bit of what you’ll need and start experimenting from there! If you like the extra challenge make yourself a set of stone tools and use them to work your project, it’s a lot of fun.
          call me Jay, i live in R.I.

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          • #6
            All I use, have ever used, and will ever use is primitive tools. I mean for everything from making my spearheads, arrowheads, blades etc. I have a beautiful Montana long bow that I can now hit groupings of 6 within 5 inches at 50 yards with heavy aluminum arrows, so I figured a heavy wood arrow would work just as well. My life pretty much involves nothing but studying and practicing and teaching my little boy and my wife native American culture. Us ourselves have a lot of native in us and I feel I have very close connection to the spirits they guide me every step I respect them and they in return lead me in the right direction. My son is 1 and a half and already knows his different types of tools what's flint and whats not and how to use an antler or hammer stone. Might not can drive flakes where they need to go or far but to me it's a blessing and I plan on teaching and learning it's my passion and right as human being to live wild and free as does my boy about to be boys and wife.

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            • #7
              Von brought up spining arrows it is important to do it. No need for fancy but an arrow should support weight too much say and the arrow will fail to fly right. You need a pretty stiff shaft. Here is a video the guy is using a fancy machine but you can do this with end supports and a rock just to make sure your arrows are stiff enough to handle the inertia.
              TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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              • #8
                I make and use my own river cane arrows, I straighten the arrows with a propane torch starting at one end and going to other end. when I have a length of reed straight I put it on my home made spline tester and cut out the length I need with the correct spline for my bow. it is important to wrap the nocked end with senew to keep it from being split by bow string. I shoot stone points also.

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                • #9
                  You can see some of my arrows in post More silver River in the flint knapping section, I brought thread up to top

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