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  • Indian trail marker?

    On the edge of my property, about 300 feet apart are two trees. They have been purposely bent as saplings to form that shape. My question is, how can I tell how old they are without cutting them down to examine the rings? The base is three to four feet wide on each tree. Does that help? How would I know an Indian did it instead of a kid from the 70's? Any input would be appreciated.

    P.S. Sorry for the crummy sketches! :-)
    The first... The second, more weird looking tree.
    "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

  • #2
    Here is some info from within our information center. I think your tress would need to be pretty old to fall into that category.

    https://forums.arrowheads.com/index....l-marker-trees

    I've seen trees shapen by natural causes such as other fallen trees. You should show us photos but to be honest I think the chances are very slim. I know in Southeastern KY Were I'm from they logged merciesly in the late 1800's early 1990's. I really didn't believe it when someone told me that they had taken nearly every sizeable tree standing until I saw old black and white photos of some of the tallest Mountains in KY completely bare. I think there are own a couple spots in the Daniel Boone National forest and a place called Lily Cornett Wood's were true virgin timber still stand...
    Josh (Ky/Tn collector)

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    • Kentucky point
      Kentucky point commented
      Editing a comment
      I will gladly show photos, as soon as winter comes. Right now the woods is so thick, I can't walk there. The original owner of my house is still alive, and he was one of the first people on my ridge. Logging is doubtful. But natural causes can explain it too.

  • #3
    Here is a list of the only known old Growth stands left in KY. More than I thought and also doesn't account for your occasional old Growth tree that hasn't been documented yet. Old Growth is still pretty rare stuff nonetheless.
    http://www.kentuckyoldgrowth.org/places.html

    And to add...

    I know it's hard to contemplate and easy to think logging is ' doubtfull' ive been there lol. But the reality is very few trees you see throughout the state are older than 100 years. Crazy I know considering the majority of the Eastern half of
    KY is forest. Even before people settled most areas fully they were logged by big time logging companies. Before coal, timber reigned supreme.
    Last edited by Kyflintguy; 06-28-2018, 07:33 PM.
    Josh (Ky/Tn collector)

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    • #4
      Believe me I know.. Meade Paper Co. is logging the heck all around us
      "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

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      • #5
        Thank you for your help!
        "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

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        • #6
          Doubtful it is a trail marker. It would have to be a mighty big tree to be that old.
          TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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          • #7
            If you have ever been to VA around Culpeper county, there are civil war era trees that are three, four, and even five feet in diameter. I even saw one that was six feet wide! So my "markers are probably just "freaks of nature" because they are only three feet wide.
            "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

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