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Clay Pot Wrapped in a Woven Basket

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  • Clay Pot Wrapped in a Woven Basket

    Dear All,

    The tightly woven basket covers much of the details of the plain clay pot at the center except around the openwork which reveals the rounded foot of the pot. The colors of the clay are gray//brown with a reddish interior, the pot also has a flared mouth. There are crackled white chalky patches around the base which appear to sit on the clay curface

    The basket appears to me to be more functional than decorative. The swing handle loops are sturdy and braided for strength, The base has four corners with a round foot that was attached with loops that were worked into the round weave of the foot.
    The piece comes from a collection in MT. While the pot might possibly have a Caddo origin, by the colors, round base with a flared neck, I have not found a similar presentation of clay pot and basket. thank you for your comments
    H: 5 3/4" (without the handle)
    Mouth Opening: 6 1/4" (widest point)

    Kind regards

    Kevin
    Last edited by KDNJ; 10-07-2018, 06:01 PM.

  • #2
    Forgive me, because I have no clue about these things, but how old is that? It looks very well made from what I can see. Great pot!
    "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

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    • #3
      Kevin - I'd say you're right about the basket being functional. It provides a method for easy carry, while at the same time offering some protection to the clay pot. Interesting. Is the exterior surface of the pot decorated in any way or just plain and smooth?
      Pickett/Fentress County, Tn - Any day on this side of the grass is a good day. -Chuck-

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      • #4
        Thank you!

        Yes, looking through the crevices in the weave, the surface is smooth, and I dont see any other types of decorations, either

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        • #5
          It could be a Caddo, but the form was not uncommon in other cultures. It has what some of the old school pot collectors called a “spittoon” shape to it, it appears? The quality of the pot would be above average if it were. The Caddo “everyday pottery” was nicer(in form and construction) than most other culture’s “Sunday Stuff.” Decoration of such is very subjective, as far as quality goes. Some prefer the simple beauty of a painted Quapaw, or the geometric beauty and color of Anasazi, while the intricate patterns and geometry of the Caddo is stunning in its’ own right.

          if it were of Caddo origin, that’s a far haul, but not impossible. They had a huge range, and the trade/travel they experienced surely went that far.

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          • #6
            show some close ups inside the pot please with good lighting. Is the bottom of to clay vessel flat inside or am I seing a shadow of the rim?
            Last edited by Hoss; 10-07-2018, 07:40 PM.
            TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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            • #7
              Here’s a variant of that style, late Mississippian/Quapaw in origin. It’s actually a 3-fer. Two others inside this one, the second is just a smaller version of this one, and the smallest is upside down..., just a small circular bowl with two tabs on one side.

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              • #8
                I'm grateful for the posts, very interesting pots- thanks for showing them to us
                I would say that this pot does have a spittoon shape to it with the rounded contours on the interior along the bottom and walls which are recessed from under the mouth. rim. These contours follow the same lines of the exterior. The width of the base extends slightly further out than the mouth rim.

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                • #9
                  Looks like done on a wheel??
                  Professor Shellman

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                  • #10
                    Thank you for asking, no definitely not by wheel, there are some rough uneven patches on the inside without any ribs

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                    • #11
                      One more photo taken with the camera pointed further down inside the pot to show the markings left from the "scooping" method that was used in shaping it from a lump of clay. The Plains Indians employed this method in making their pots, as opposed to the coil method as had been used by the other tribes.

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