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  • mammoth effigy

    I wonder if anyone out there has info on mammoth effigies? Some of the ones I find seem to be walking over a mountain. Often times I find them portrayed from behind and looking back as they go over the mountain as if they were going away. I wonder if those were from the end times of that age. This one is just a side view though.
     

  • #2
    I can see the mammoth, but is made by nature, not by man.

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    • #3
      It's amazing how you do that from a fuzzy picture.  You are absolutely sure huh?  The picture is so bad and doesn't do it justice, because of that I was almost too embarrassed to post it. I wonder if you could explain exactly how nature made it? At least you do see the elephant.  These are predicted as to the character content and artistic technique before I even pick them up.  You have to at least be wondering how I can find so many "natural coincidences".  Maybe I'll run out soon?   NOT!  I know where to find more.  Maybe there's someone who's actually qualified in the Eugene, Oregon area that would like to go out with me to verify what I do one way or the other, who's word you would take?

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      • #4
        By the way although this particular one I have not run by the local experts yet the universal response I get when I show this one to my friends "Holy $#!+, that must be worth a fortune.

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        • #5
          When you were young, did you ever lie in the grass on a summer day and see faces and images in the changing cumulus clouds?  It's the same principle where this rock is concerned.  In other words, like the images in a cloud, it's your mind and imagination seeing a mammoth.  Your rock shows no evidence of human alteration, and clearer pictures would not alter that fact.  It's a natural rock, not a human crafted effigy.
          Rhode Island

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          • #6
            Now this mammoth has opened my eyes! She, obviously pregnant with little hairy elephants, just looks so happy, walking up there on her mountain.
            So I decided to go out and find some for myself, and I took my camera. I got gps readings on every piece I found so I can go out there and pick them up after I find out how valuable they are from our expert on these. Each is completely insitu, but please excuse the extreme clearness of the pics as I had no cellphone cam to use.
            In about ten minutes I found fifteen effigees, and I never left this huge effigee site on my land. I think I may give up collecting Native American artifacts altogether so I can train myself better for finding effigees.
            So, everyone go find those effigees- THEY ARE EVERYWHERE!
            http://picasaweb.google.com/Jacksonr...eat=directlink

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            • #7
              If you believe you believe, no use taking to a zealot as you will always loose the argument even when the obvious truth is on your side.
              Here is my man made pecked petroglyph of a scorpion. I know its man made, I wonder how I know this, because it is obvious.
              What you are posting is not obvious its imagination.
              Jack

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              • #8
                Here are a few of my best effigy want to be rocks. I think they have real good potential. I wonder how nature made these, nature is very creative. These were all found on top of a mesa near LaJitas Texas. Who can tell me how they were made?
                Jack







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                • #9
                  Cliff, just wondered if you would allow a bunch of us over to hunt effigies in your special spot. Your expedition with insitu photos and descriptions are the best I have seen posted on this site in the last couple of weeks.
                  And by the way Greywolf really appreciated yours as well, just wish you would have made them a little fuzzier and added some long winded explanations :lall   :cheer:  :woohoo:
                  Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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                  • #10
                    Sorry guys, you're not even close, although I have to admit, Wildhorse's buffalo was pretty easy to see.  I didn't even have to squint. 
                    Next time try some semi precious stones like jasper, agate, jade, or quartz.  Make sure you have an ancient, and even patina, with no modern breaks.  Look in known sites.  Only an idiot would search his driveway.  Find what looks like an erupting volcano, and then take a picture of it. 
                    The cloud analogy is a lot closer than you think.  Here where I live, in the summer, thunderheads form over the mountains to the east in the afternoon, while overhead the sky is blue.  Just as we did as kids I'm pretty sure they saw stuff in them too.  Is it possible that a superstitious mind might think that the spirits were forming them?  In fact wasn't animism the belief of the day?  Any how, the reason I feel these are not just natural concretions is based on much more than a single image in a stone.  Heck, I got Abraham Lincoln on my bathroom floor in the form of a wadded up sock.  The mind does see things it wants to, I agree.  The images I see are far more complex, and based artistically on either thunderheads over the mountains, or an eruption from a volcano.  They all contain an erupting volcano with a distinct set of images that meld together in a very distinct pattern, and will contain the same repeating characters.  A human, dog, cat (large and small), bear, volcano with face, Elephant, sky god, and I hate to admit it, but a gorilla.  (Ouch.  I know that last ones going to be thrown back at me.)  You guys already think I'm crazy so, so what.  ( And no I don't think that there is still a gorilla/ bigfoot out running around in the woods.)  The images are blended in such a way that unless you know the pattern they do look random.  It does require some mental participation to see.  The roiling cloud of an eruption or thunderhead is the artistic license for these.  Another confusing element to this art is what's called anamorphic art.  Meaning each character has to be viewed from a single precise location to produce an image.  Here's a link to a modern example.  Anamorphic  Art
                    Another confusing aspect of these things is that they are given life with light, and shadow.  The color , and angle of the light, in relation to the lines cut into the stone, is very important.  The longer waves of the red spectrum are best to use. In the morning or late afternoon the sun produces these, and a campfire does too.  In fact the flickering of the campfire causes a kind of animation as the images jump back and forth.  Blue rays tend to wash out the image.
                    I wish I had never stumbled upon these sometimes.  It takes a lot of guts to put myself out here like this, and endure the heckles.  I am very aware of the disciplines and aspects of artifact authentication.  I have a nice arrowhead, and artifact collection myself, and I am familiar with percussive, and pressure flaking techniques. I know what a conchoidal fracture is, and am also familiar with pecking, and grinding techniques and what they look like.  I have studied patina, mineralization, and the effects of weathering for many years now.  Also being into faceting, and polishing of stones, I am familiar with material types and properties of stones, and what it takes to work them.  I've also made a few arrowheads myself.  I'm not a zealot or someone that believes in something in the face of overwhelming evidence.  If you were to sit down with me in person, and show me irrefutable evidence I am not so stubborn that I would not accept it.  The fact is I did take these to some experts, and after an examination, explanation, and demonstration, they were convinced that these were real.  So you'll have to forgive me if it takes more than just a strangers statement that you don't see the tool marks in a fuzzy picture to convince me otherwise. 
                    My offer still stands to have someone that's local to me, evaluate these in person.

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                    • #11
                      OK Wanderingrock; I really did not want to waste my time anymore with you but you contiune to waste ours, so I must place one more answer to your rocks. I know 100% or even 10000% sure that they are NOT repeat NOT made by our Native Americans. Your continued denials is almost an insult to our intelligence. What do you think you are talking to? A bunch of nut cases. These guys are not as stupid as you seem to think. Find a forum somewhere where you will be dealing with someone who will buy your rocks. If they are not natural then who knows how or what created them. It was not our Native Americans.

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                      • #12
                        Get yourself a better camera and send over a picture where we can see the tooling you are talking about.
                        Show use a letter from the Favell Musem that backs up what you are saying. I used to visit Gene Favell back in the 1990's when I visted Klamath Falls Oregon quite often and do not think he would see anything in what you are showing but rocks.
                        The Favell is a wonderfull museum in a very pretty setting beside the Klamath River and is worth going to see. I loved spending time there. The collection is the best of artifacts that come out of the Great Basin and I never saw an effigy in his collection like you are showing.
                        Jack

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                        • #13
                          Hay Graywolf. And I used to love the Columbia River room. A whole room full of Columbia river stuff. Great collection. Another great collection is in Cashmire Wa. By Wenatchee. Beautiful collection and well desplayed. Well worth seeing. There is a small collection at Wanapum Dam that is worth stopping at during the summer. By Vantage.

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                          • #14
                            If I ever get back to the Northwest I will stop in and see those places. I spent a full day at the Favell Musem one time and could not take it all in. 1,000's of pieces to fall in love with.

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                            • #15
                              Wanderingrock come on you have got to be kidding me? I'm laughing so hard my side hurts please stop. Can't believe I have been throwing my effigy rocks in the creeks all these years.  Tell you what I will grab a few hundred next time and I will sell them to you for $1.00 a piece. How many you want? Just think how much of an investment that would be for you. :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:

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