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  • #46
    http://www.trueartifacts.com/home.html
    This website also shows what happens when an individual with no proper or practical training or knowledge in tools and art attempts to define their finds, without any real understanding of the processes involved, or the techniques employed by stone age cultures.  Stone worked by human hands exhibits DISTINCT CHARACTERISTICS.  It is exceedingly obvious tot he trained eye and require little thought to identify.  In the case of this website, the presence of genuine artifacts only leads to the erroneous idea that every stone nearby is also an artifact, which leads to the individuals imagination fitting each and every rock into some catagory, regardless of use wear, signs of being ground, chipped, or otherwise shaped.  I have personally worked a number of types of stone, and seen/handled HUNDREDS of genuine artifacts in private collections and museums from all over the world, and I have never once seen anything like the so-called effigies in this thread, or this website, anywhere in the world.  The overwhelming evidence, as I mentioned, is the complete lack of any shaping in any form. 
    Another point:  if it is genuine, replicate it. Virtually every tool or piece of art in any museum or throughout arrowheads.com has been replicated exactly in modern times.  So, replicate these effigies, and you will have convinced me otherwise.

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    • #47
      buildsthefire wrote:


      how is it worth noting??  its just a pebble!  I see ZERO sign of human involvement except for some skillful photography and a decent imagination.  How you can draw comparisons between the deliberate, and frankly, VASTLY more sophisticated art of Paleo Europe and your gravel driveway finds is beyond me.  There is NO comparison between the masterful art of the Paleolithic and your pebbles.
          I cannot believe you cannot see it.  I believe the reason is due to lack of proper training in how to identify Creative Researching Associated (with) Paleolithic Optistimulated Lithic Art (crapola for short). 
         To stimulate the proper spiritual awareness certain procedures must be adhered to, or you will never be able to see what the rocks have to tell you. This doesn't come naturally and sometimes it takes minutes (up to 38) to perfect.  It also helps to have "mood" music, such as Spice Girls, in the background.  I personally have found that Leonard Nimoy's greatest hits works best for me. A word of caution here, dancing to the music or playing air guitar will diminish your chances of success.  Continuing on, you need to cock your head 24 degrees to the north and blink your left eye rapidly while pressing most of your body weight onto your right foot.  You will know when you have reached the correct state of "rock vertigo" when your eyes begin to water and your thoughts are consumed by chia gnomes and flannel snuggies.  Quickly move the object into your field of view and voila...you too will see it.

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      • #48
        You guys are great, Made my day thanks for the ideas. I will give it a try.

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        • #49
          Hey Hey Hey Don't forget the Smoke Dude!!!! B)

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          • #50
            I tried the smoke, but just couldn't get to where i could see the visions, I couldn't focus and then got the munchies ( cheetos!!!) so I just kinda wandered off. Back again and have got to try Neanderthal's CRAPOLA methodology. Only problem, I can't find a copy of Leonards greatest hits anywhere. I'd give anything to be able to see the truth.
            Let you know how it works, and thanks for explaining the correct procedures Neanderthal!
            Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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            • #51
              Big N
              That is funny. LMAO.
              Jack

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              • #52
                give it a rest with the mammoth think about it would paleo man sit around morphing that rock into an effigy if it couldnt help him eat more mammoth
                North Carolina

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                • #53
                  SWEEEET, I've got a few " mammoth effigies " I threw in the rock garden...and I just thought they were rocks.

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                  • #54
                    I think.............the best response, is no response.

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                    • #55
                      Agree Butch, the longer you respond the longer the crap keeps coming!! Don't find it amusing anymore. I see the green number and say not again please!!!

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                      • #56
                        I take it you saw what I was talking about on that European one.  Why doesn't anyone comment on the scratches at the end of the trunk of mine?  This stone is a seven on the hardness scale.  What natural force do you think could have chiseled lines like that into a recess like that.  Isn't that exactly what you would expect to find on a polished stone? (Tool marks in the recesses that didn't get polished all the way out.)

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                        • #57
                          wanderingrock wrote:


                          I take it you saw what I was talking about on that European one.  Why doesn't anyone comment on the scratches at the end of the trunk of mine?  This stone is a seven on the hardness scale.  What natural force do you think could have chiseled lines like that into a recess like that.  Isn't that exactly what you would expect to find on a polished stone? (Tool marks in the recesses that didn't get polished all the way out.)
                          3 questions then-
                          "This stone is a seven on the hardness scale".
                          What is the hardness of the white softer rock that has naturally eroded away, leaving those fault lines?
                          "What natural force do you think could have chiseled lines like that into a recess like that"
                          What tremendous natural force created a rock of a 7 mohr hardness in the first place? Would those forces be powerful enough to erode away softer materials yet leave an imaginary elephant? Of course they would, and Mother Nature also apparently has a great sense of humor.
                          "(Tool marks in the recesses that didn't get polished all the way out.)"
                          What kind of tools and what hardness material were they, that you theorize caused these natural marks in that 7 hardness stone?

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                          • #58
                            Well there are no identifications the stone has been modafied .. so its a rock but its cool. Heres a pic of 2 effigy pieces picked up at the mouth of a hill top spring

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                            • #59
                              wanderingrock wrote:


                              Sorry guys, you're not even close, although I have to admit, Wildhorse's buffalo was pretty easy to see.  I didn't even have to squint. 
                              Next time try some semi precious stones like jasper, agate, jade, or quartz.  Make sure you have an ancient, and even patina, with no modern breaks.  Look in known sites.  Only an idiot would search his driveway.  Find what looks like an erupting volcano, and then take a picture of it. 
                              The cloud analogy is a lot closer than you think.  Here where I live, in the summer, thunderheads form over the mountains to the east in the afternoon, while overhead the sky is blue.  Just as we did as kids I'm pretty sure they saw stuff in them too.  Is it possible that a superstitious mind might think that the spirits were forming them?  In fact wasn't animism the belief of the day?  Any how, the reason I feel these are not just natural concretions is based on much more than a single image in a stone.  Heck, I got Abraham Lincoln on my bathroom floor in the form of a wadded up sock.  The mind does see things it wants to, I agree.  The images I see are far more complex, and based artistically on either thunderheads over the mountains, or an eruption from a volcano.  They all contain an erupting volcano with a distinct set of images that meld together in a very distinct pattern, and will contain the same repeating characters.  A human, dog, cat (large and small), bear, volcano with face, Elephant, sky god, and I hate to admit it, but a gorilla.  (Ouch.  I know that last ones going to be thrown back at me.)  You guys already think I'm crazy so, so what.  ( And no I don't think that there is still a gorilla/ bigfoot out running around in the woods.)  The images are blended in such a way that unless you know the pattern they do look random.  It does require some mental participation to see.  The roiling cloud of an eruption or thunderhead is the artistic license for these.  Another confusing element to this art is what's called anamorphic art.  Meaning each character has to be viewed from a single precise location to produce an image.  Here's a link to a modern example.  Anamorphic  Art
                              Another confusing aspect of these things is that they are given life with light, and shadow.  The color , and angle of the light, in relation to the lines cut into the stone, is very important.  The longer waves of the red spectrum are best to use. In the morning or late afternoon the sun produces these, and a campfire does too.  In fact the flickering of the campfire causes a kind of animation as the images jump back and forth.  Blue rays tend to wash out the image.
                              I wish I had never stumbled upon these sometimes.  It takes a lot of guts to put myself out here like this, and endure the heckles.  I am very aware of the disciplines and aspects of artifact authentication.  I have a nice arrowhead, and artifact collection myself, and I am familiar with percussive, and pressure flaking techniques. I know what a conchoidal fracture is, and am also familiar with pecking, and grinding techniques and what they look like.  I have studied patina, mineralization, and the effects of weathering for many years now.  Also being into faceting, and polishing of stones, I am familiar with material types and properties of stones, and what it takes to work them.  I've also made a few arrowheads myself.  I'm not a zealot or someone that believes in something in the face of overwhelming evidence.  If you were to sit down with me in person, and show me irrefutable evidence I am not so stubborn that I would not accept it.  The fact is I did take these to some experts, and after an examination, explanation, and demonstration, they were convinced that these were real.  So you'll have to forgive me if it takes more than just a strangers statement that you don't see the tool marks in a fuzzy picture to convince me otherwise. 
                              My offer still stands to have someone that's local to me, evaluate these in person.
                                I clicked on Anamorphic Art, and the site's name is Grand Illusion! Coincidental, could be by Styx.

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                              • #60
                                Sure, native people could have picked up stones that look like certain things naturally, and thought "wow, this is cool, I'll keep this".  But there has to be millions upon millions of naturally formed rocks that you can imagine something out of, and these are just one of those millions.  So odds are, you are the first person to pick these up, ever, and see something.  They are very obviously naturally formed, the only human influence is your own imagination.

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