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Bread From Acorns (1933) (​​​​​​​Yosemite)

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  • Bread From Acorns (1933) (​​​​​​​Yosemite)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4-F5N63Cdo

    California

  • #2
    Thanks Tom, the making of the bread shared a lot of the processes, materials and methods used to make which I'm guessing were used for generations.
    Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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    • #3
      I collected at least 1/2 bushel of acorns recently. For my squirrel friends. We have no nearby oak trees. Much to my disgust, lol, I discovered that blue jays just swallow the acorns whole. Even with the caps still on, they just swallow them whole. So, once again, me and the squirrels lose out to a noisy corvid.
      Rhode Island

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      • Olden
        Olden commented
        Editing a comment
        from google:
        "A Jay can fit up to nine acorns in its gullet at any one time, although on average they transport two or three, with one in the bill. This behavior usually starts in September and will carry on until all the available acorns have been eaten or hidden."

        Reclaim the acorns Japanese/Cormorant style:
        drill holes in half dozen acorns, tie them to anchored 3' lines - pour 'em back in the basket

        * just kidding C!
        Last edited by Olden; 11-09-2021, 04:26 PM.

      • CMD
        CMD commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, Don. I had no idea. I also give up. Lol…

      • tomf
        tomf commented
        Editing a comment
        Every spring we have a stand-off between hatchling woodpeckers and bluejays in the trees around our home. Woodpeckers have claimed these ancient oaks for generations, but each spring they are obliged to see off the young marauders. Both species stockpile mast nuts and every barn door/wall, gate post and power pole is drilled top to bottom and plugged with an acorn.

    • #4
      nice insight into the not to distant past
      Wyoming

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      • #5
        Now that’s a super cool video..makes me appreciate goin to super market for bread..Thanks Doc.
        Floridaboy.

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        • tomf
          tomf commented
          Editing a comment
          I was especially interested in the leaching in a pit. Now I've seen the details of sticks, straining material and splash brush, I understand much better. Also water-tight basketry on display and some natty attire including yellow-hammer headband (by the look of it) and plenty of shell ornaments sewn on buckskin (?).

        • Hal Gorges
          Hal Gorges commented
          Editing a comment
          I noticed all of it...that was a fantastic teaching lesson 👍

      • #6
        Was really cool to see their techniques. Makes me think that the storing method and techniques would allow for permanent settlements anywhere there was good nut harvesting . I’m not sure I agree with the last statement of the video. I too would appreciate and enjoy them not just an Indian.

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        • CMD
          CMD commented
          Editing a comment
          Archaic adaptation in the Northeast has sometimes been termed the Mast Forest Archaic, due to the strong reliance on the nuts of these various trees.

        • SGT.Digger
          SGT.Digger commented
          Editing a comment
          Interesting CMD .

      • #7
        Fun video, happy smiling native, never tried acorn flour, the old timers from my childhood told the stories of survival in hard times on acorn and mesquite bean flour , guess she didn't need a yeast ? Looks like a hard biscuit.
        2ET703 South Central Texas

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        • #8
          I've eaten acorn mush a few times in Yosemite at different gatherings a lot of the women adapted plains style clothing in the later years for Big Times .

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          • #9
            https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/.../maggie-howard
            California

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            • clovisoid
              clovisoid commented
              Editing a comment
              Interesting detail about her life. She was born and lived through several decades of incredible change.

          • #10
            Great video.

            South American natives make a bread out of cassava (yucca/manioc), and in the bitter variety cyanide has to be removed. It's interesting that while the process is a bit different, there are a lot of similarities in the process and tools (basketry, pestles, etc.) The final flour looks very similar.

            The liquid that comes out used to be used poison arrows for hunting. Only a couple of types of famous poison dart frogs are toxic enough to use, so most of poison actually came from plants.

            A video, no subtitles and more modern, but you can see the process if interested.
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ue0Adbep0U0
            Hong Kong, but from Indiana/Florida

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            • tomf
              tomf commented
              Editing a comment
              That's interesting. I imagine there's much in common between the lifestyle of some isolated tribes in South America today (and elsewhere for that matter) and North American indians. Similar tool kit and technology. Good for thousands of years. Today those South Americans are facing the 21st century version of the pressures that destroyed so many lives and cultures here in the north.
              I've read some California Indians used poison arrows for war but don't know what kind of poison was used. Obviously not acorns, tannin is not cyanide. Snake venom?

              edit: I wrote the above before I noticed the video link in your post. Great video. Quite a bit different from Yosemite in some ways but very similar in others.
              Craving a giant manioc pancake for my breakfast now.
              Last edited by tomf; 11-10-2021, 11:45 AM.

          • #11
            I’ve eaten a few acorns. Must leech bitterness out
            Digging in GA, ‘bout a mile from the Savannah River

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