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  • Thoughts, Opinions, Suggestions...

    Found in western Pennsylvania (Mercer County) in 2007. Dr. Mike Gramley states the material is a purple slate from Vermont (long way from home). Not much has been recovered from the site other than 2 tear dropped knives and 2 broken Ashtabulas. Would like to read everyone's thoughts, opinions and suggestions.
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  • #2
    Not sure paohrocks......with those two grooves....maybe some sort of sharpening tool for bone or antler?

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    • #3
      Very cool! Could be a native whetstone!!

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      • #4
        Sharpening stone is what comes to mind but it looks polished so I'm going to say Gorget preform. I would of picked that up for sure.

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        • #5
          I like the wet stone idea, or maybe a unfinished gorget? Looks interesting.

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          • #6
            I don't know but it kinda reminds me of a modern fishing hook sharpening stone. Don't think it is but at first sight it reminds me of one. Hopefully you'll figure it out. I like the Whetstone thought.
            Last edited by Sugaree; 12-02-2019, 05:33 PM.

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            • #7
              Great artifact, the head scratchers are always my favorite! Maybe a bar atlatl weight??

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              • #8
                It might something historical. Until you get metal tools, you don't really need fine grained wet stones. Stone celts, stone axes, bone fishhooks, flint knives, etc. wouldn't be sharpened on a wet stone, a sandstone or other slab would work just fine.

                It very well could be Native American, just from that window time around the fur trade and French & Indian wars.

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                • #9
                  I found this on bar amulets in 1917 book written by Warren Moorehead Stone Ornaments of the American Indians. You may not be able to read it, but you can download for free on Google Play.


                  Click image for larger version

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                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by Cecilia; 12-02-2019, 05:26 AM.

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                  • #10
                    No opinion , very interesting...

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                    • #11
                      abrader / polishing stone
                      I find very rough ones out of quartzite.

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                    • #12
                      Yeah that is a real interesting find for sure and one that just fuels the quest. It falls under the whatizit category. There are many finds that the exact use is unknown because there has not been anything found with it to verify its use. Its obviously worked by human hands but for what purpose. Really cool find there. I like the responses.
                      The chase is better than the catch...
                      I'm Frank and I'm from the flatlands of N'Eastern Illinois...

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                      • #13
                        I don't know what else that could be except for a slate/shale tablet used for sharpening bone implements, aside from fish hooks. What I do find odd is Mike's opinion that the stone originated in Vermont. The Mauch Chunk geologic formation is exposed from central Pa. to Pittsburgh, and into West Virginia. It's noted for having thick strata of reddish gray, and purple, slate and shale. There's quite a bit of that colored slate throughout western Pa. and Ohio. And in some Glacial Kame areas .
                        http://www.ravensrelics.com/

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                        • Lindenmeier-Man
                          Lindenmeier-Man commented
                          Editing a comment
                          You the lithic material MAN, Paul !

                        • pkfrey
                          pkfrey commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Thanks, Big L ! I believe Clovisoid was really close. I think it is a whetstone, so named because the old timers spit on it first to make it wet before honing a metal hunting knife. Sharpening stones used for bone awls and tools wouldn't leave behind those kind of parallel cut marks incised into the stone. They're to deep. I think it was a whetstone carried in a pouch as an accessory to simply hone down the blade of a metal hunting knife. After a deer was shot, every two or three swipes with a knife would dull the blade, and it was easy to just take a small whetstone to keep it sharp. The stone was just held in place while the knife edge was honed back and forth within the grooves. From either the time of the first fur trade era, or later, during the muzzleloading days of hunting, late 18th, early 19th century. Possibly not Native related at all.

                      • #14
                        Really appreciate all the thoughts, opinions, and suggestions. Thank you.
                        Last edited by paohrocks; 12-03-2019, 12:33 PM.

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                        • #15
                          I definitely not sure but wanted to show some fish hook sharpening stones. I used to use one just like that it had two groves. This was ment to sharpen treble hooks two hooks at a time. Most of the older hook sharpening stones had groves just like this. Click image for larger version

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                          • Cecilia
                            Cecilia commented
                            Editing a comment
                            My Grandpa had one! This pic brought back memories....he taught me how take brim off hook without getting finned...
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