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Adena rounded poll celt

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  • Adena rounded poll celt

    This style Celt was utilized by the Adena Culture, (500 B.C.-200A.D.), for the use of girdling trees, and cutting small saplings. Adena Rounded Poll Celts can be identified by their triangular shape, and rounded, or oval ends. These are most commonly found in Ohio, as well as Kentucky, with few being found in Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Fine hard stone was used in the production of these Celts. The one seen below is made of some kind of granite.

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    "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

  • #2
    Oops


    Rounded POLE celt. If y'all decide to do something with this, it's pole...my bad.
    "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

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    • #3
      Made me look. It’s a fine personal find KP
      NW Georgia

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      • #4
        Hey KP. Nice post...i think you were correct with "Poll". Which describes the "head" end of stone tools.. just trying to help .... Red
        SW Connecticut

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        • #5
          Thanks KP interesting

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          • #6
            Got a couple of those from Missouri
            Stagger Lee/ SE Missouri

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            • Kentucky point
              Kentucky point commented
              Editing a comment
              They liked traveling. Did you know that the Obsidian Ross blades archaeologists found in Chilicothe Ohio, were sourced from Yellowstone in Wyoming? Pretty neat.

            • Broken Arrow
              Broken Arrow commented
              Editing a comment
              I wasn't aware of that, but it isn't surprising considering that would be one of the closest sources of obsidian. That material travelled a long way.

          • #7
            Originally posted by Kentucky point View Post
            This style Celt was utilized by the Adena Culture, (500 B.C.-200A.D.), for the use of girdling trees, and cutting small saplings. Adena Rounded Poll Celts can be identified by their triangular shape, and rounded, or oval ends. These are most commonly found in Ohio, as well as Kentucky, with few being found in Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Fine hard stone was used in the production of these Celts. The one seen below is made of some kind of granite audacity temp mail origin.

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            Thank you for the post, so interesting and beautiful!
            Last edited by Fleurpink; 01-16-2020, 02:26 PM.

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            • #8
              Nice post. We should be able to use this nicely
              South Dakota

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              • #9
                Can you give us some different pictures or angles to look at? Something that really shows its shape . Maybe a poll end shot too
                South Dakota

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                • Kentucky point
                  Kentucky point commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I will have to do it later today, because I'll be in town.

                • SDhunter
                  SDhunter commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Ok

              • #10
                Originally posted by SDhunter View Post
                Can you give us some different pictures or angles to look at? Something that really shows its shape . Maybe a poll end shot too
                Click image for larger version

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                "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

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                • #11
                  Thanks Ethan. Those look fine.
                  South Dakota

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                  • #12
                    It’s sitting proudly in the information center now
                    South Dakota

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                  • #13
                    Nice work Ethan thanks for the information.
                    TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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                    • Kentucky point
                      Kentucky point commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thanks Matt. I'll be doing more research into sites and tools soon.

                  • #14
                    While the axe underwent changes through time toward the discontinuation of the groove, the change was not complete until some time during the Woodland period, when the grooved, ground-stone axe was replaced by the celt (the grooveless axe) as a utilitarian tool form. This is not to say that the celt did not appear until the Woodland period. In fact, while no one really knows when celts were first used, there is evidence that they were in use during the Middle if not the Early Archaic period. Known early celts lacked the material selection and finished look of later celts and may have appeared more adz-like in form.

                    Not only had the groove disappeared during the Woodland period, but this new form of axe was smaller and much lighter.The poll area of this axe form was also very different.The poll of the grooved ax was often the largest part of the axe, but it is the smallest part of the celt.

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                    • oldrocks2
                      oldrocks2 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Good info and thanks for your post. I think the earliest axes were full groove that would make them harder to make and haft compared to a celt.

                    • Kentucky point
                      Kentucky point commented
                      Editing a comment
                      The problem is, the person just copied and pasted it from another website.

                  • #15
                    Great, I think there is a name for this type of thing. No credit given for source.

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