Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Steubenville Stemmed

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Steubenville Stemmed

    Steubenville Stemmed
    Posted by [Hoss]:



    A young man found this in CT last week and sent me the pictures I am leaning toward Steubenville. What do you all think?

    Click image for larger version

Name:	image_10824.jpg
Views:	118
Size:	53.8 KB
ID:	201563

    Click image for larger version

Name:	image_10826.jpg
Views:	141
Size:	58.8 KB
ID:	201565

    Click image for larger version

Name:	image_10825.jpg
Views:	124
Size:	62.7 KB
ID:	201564


    He just happened upon the point. He is not a collector. I have an email out to him describing basal grinding and asking if it has it. I will keep you posted
    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

  • #2
    Posted by [Olden]:
    Looks like a Woodland Stubie/Fox Creek to me: there's a few pics of both at this link

    http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/am...id-please.html
    (Link not working)

    Here's a crappy pic of a couple of mine (#4)

    http://forums.arrowheads.com/forum/g...-nice-rhyolite
    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

    Comment


    • #3
      Posted by [Paleolution]:
      That's a really cool point, what is the material? It looks similar to the basalts we find out west.

      Posted by [Hoss]:
      To me Tyson it looks like it could be Basalt
      Thanks for the links Olden
      Pretty sure here on Steubenville?Fox Creek like point.

      The doubts I am considering come from the contracting stem. They have weak shoulders and a concave base but most I have seen have straight sides on the stems.

      Posted by [cgode]:
      The stem is what I see as the stumbling block as well here. Could be Fox Creek but like you said......usually have straight sides.....


      Posted by [jimr]:
      here is a frame points excavated by me at the East Steubenville site several years before it was destroyed

      Click image for larger version

Name:	image_10827.jpg
Views:	144
Size:	163.8 KB
ID:	201570

      I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

      Comment


      • #4
        Posted by [Hoss]:
        Thanks for the look at those fine artifacts Jimr

        http://collections.nysm.nysed.gov/pr...med-plate.html

        5, 7 and 8 look like they contract to me in the pictures.

        On behalf of the Fox Creek camp here is a link to a page from the MAS

        http://webhost.bridgew.edu/c1hoffman/foxcrst.htm

        I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

        Comment


        • #5
          Posted by [CMD]:
          In the 1991 "A Handbook of Indian Artifacts from Southern New England", Ma. archaeologist Curtis Hoffman developed a classification system that included much of the descriptive text of the original classification by Wm. Fowler, while introducing the names more current to our own times where Northeastern typology is concerned. Hoffman's typology mostly uses the typology outlined in Ritchie's work. Steubenville Stemmed is interpreted in Hoffman's guide as another name for Fox Creek Stemmed. The use of these two names continues to confuse me somewhat, as I don't know if Fox Creek supplanted Steubenville or if the 2 names are both used, depending on where found. In any event, the biggest problem I had with the point shown and a Fox Creek classification is the fact that the blade is widest near the tip, which seems un-Fox Creek-like to me. Here are Hoffman's words re Fox Creek Stemmed: "This point is always relatively long and broad, with a truncated broad sloping stem produced by slight removal of basal corners".(Hoffman, p. 22) The quote is actually a verbatum retention of Fowler's description, and doesn't indicate where the widest point is usually found. Of the 5 examples illustrated in Boudreau's 2008 typology, 2 have contracting stems, one is markedly contracting. I'm not suggesting, BTW, that another classification be considered; just observing the widest point near the tip is odd. Unless it's partly a photo angle illusion. And in the end I believe Fox Creek/Steubenville is the best bet.

          Posted by [Hoss]:
          Found this article this morning. Very interesting. from the the web pages of West Virginia Division of Culture and History

          http://www.wvculture.org/shpo/es/Technology_Website.pdf

          Charlie foxcreek steubenville is a conundrum for sure LOL I never thought I would use that word in a sentence.


          Click image for larger version

Name:	image_10828.jpg
Views:	126
Size:	110.0 KB
ID:	201571

          Charie the point also seems to have had some stacks in manufacture which may lend to the asymmetric appearance I have read some place that some of these points had a mocronate. The one I am showing seems to have that type of tip.


          Posted by [CMD]:
          Hoss wrote:
          Found this article this morning. Very interesting. from the the web pages of West Virginia Division of Culture and History
          www.wvculture.org/shpo/es/Technology_Website.pdf
          Charlie foxcreek steubenville is a conundrum for sure LOL I never thought I would use that word in a sentence.

          Well, that paper presents a conundrum. Fox Creeks are clearly Middle Woodland in New England. Recall in Ritchie's initial NY typology Steubenville were still widely regarded as Late Paleo lances, until, as Ritchie noted, they turned up in context with ceramics.

          Hoss wrote:
          Click image for larger version

Name:	image_10828.jpg
Views:	142
Size:	110.0 KB
ID:	201572
          Charie the point also seems to have had some stacks in manufacture which may lend to the asymmetric appearance I have read some place that some of these points had a mocronate. The one I am showing seems to have that type of tip.

          From Jeff Boudreau's 2008 typology, p. 42, regarding Fox Creek Stemmed, he notes : "Some of these points display a nipple-like tip. Experiments have shown that a nipple results from drilling a hole, from each side of a stone(gorget), meeting in the middle. Once the holes meet, there is no longer abrasion to the tip." Don't know about the theory, but have noted the trait in some Fox Creeks I have as well as the point under discussion. BTW, I don't know the meaning of "mocronate" in the event I'm pointing out something else entirely.



          Posted by [Hoss]:

          http://www.archaeologywordsmith.com/...erms=mocronate
          I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

          Comment

          Working...
          X