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The French & Indian War 1754-63

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  • The French & Indian War 1754-63

    The French & Indian War 1754-63

    Originally Posted by [Olden]:

    From Wiki:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_and_Indian_War

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=XLey9WWCgoA


    Posted by [CMD]:
    Thanks, Olden! Always enjoyed reading about these colonial conflicts, which were the NA theaters of conflicts also fought in Europe as a series of late 17th-18th century wars. Folks usually think of the last one, with famous military units like Roger's Rangers, who fought "Indian style" asymmetric warfare. Beginning in 1689, 4 wars together called the "French and Indian Wars" were fought in NA.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_and_Indian_Wars

    Speaking of "Indian style" fighting, the originator of the "rangers" in NA and asymmetric warfare was Benjamin Church, of Plymouth Colony and Little Compton, RI, who was one of the leading officers of King Philip's War(1675-76) in southern New England and led "ranger" units consisting of Englishmen and natives on raids into Canada during the first two French and Indian wars.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benj...hurch_(ranger)

    Hope you don't mind the short detour, Olden! It was Church's tactics that would transform how colonial forces fought the natives, including with his own ranger units in the first two French and Indian Wars.

    How Benjamin Church changed warfare in North America, 4 minute clip:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=qE3gmIehl3U


    Posted by [gunbunny]:
    cool thanks Olden documentaries of that era are few and far between. It seems like there are hundreds of civil war ones to every one on this period. All I need now is popcorn and beer my night is set :cheer:


    Posted by [Olden]:
    Hey Charlie, Thanks for the additional info. - looks like I have some interesting study ahead of me. It would be nice to have a category on the site for Early U.S. History, instead of artifacts & knowledge simply ending with the Contact Period. U.S. history will tie the politics (here & abroad) and people's interactions to the very land we're hunting - there's many a rich story to be told that lie between/around the U.S. borders! Thanks again for your input: always insightful!


    Posted by [CMD ]:
    That's a pretty good idea, Olden. There's a back door to that, in a sense, with the metal detecting category, where you can use a time period artifact to introduce links to time period history that isn't necessarily native related, like a Gold Rush era artifacts, for instance. A category of it's own would be fun. I just laughed, because I thought "right now I'd settle for all the kinks fixed", but maybe we can create that in the future. YouTube videos are a great way to introduce interesting things pertaining to our history. I know I enjoy your selections


    Posted by [CMD ]:
    Olden, one of the most interesting sites closely associated with the French and Indian wars is the town of Deerfield, Ma., on the Ct. River. I've always been interested in that town because it remained on the frontier for so long. In 1675, during King Philip's War, the natives attacked and burned the town to the ground just a few years after it had been established. During the first French and Indian War(King William's War, 1688-1697), outlying farms were often raided, but the town itself was spared. During the second French and Indian War(Queen Anne's War, 1702-1713), Deerfield was destroyed by the French and Indians in 1704, and dozens of captives led on foot 230 miles back to Quebec, where the French force had originated. Some captives never returned and chose to live with their native captors. Others returned and wrote best selling accounts of "captivity among the savages". The 1704 Raid on Deerfield became one of the most famous stories of the entire French and Indian Wars.

    This page includes a link to a video on the raid, but that video may need to be viewed on a computer and not a tablet.

    http://1704.deerfield.history.museum/home.do#

    This YouTube clip explains the focus of the above linked webpage. There were 5 culture groups involved in the raid:

    https://www.youtube.com/feature=player_embedded

    http://burnpit.us/2012/02/english-se...ch-and-indians

    The captives were led on foot the 230 miles back to Quebec in the dead of winter.....

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    Posted by [OnewiththewilD]:
    ive always been fascinated by this era of our history (being french canadian, indian and some english myself) and almost every weekend me and a buddy of mine (who is a history teacher) go hiking and hanging out in the woods and we end up talking about the F&I war or King Philips war. that short movie was great Olden! thanks! ( p.s. maybe im a little twisted but i cant help but smile and grin whenever i hear the THWUMP of a warclub! :evil: )

    Posted by [gregszybala]:
    Thanks you guys


    Posted by [Olden]:
    Hey Charlie, Those are some interesting links to Deerfield MA., living there was probably akin to the citizens trying to make a life in the Gaza Strip these days! While doing a search for artifacts from Deerfield, the first link I clicked on happened to be your post on the Sugarloaf Paleo Site located there (most excellent by the way)
    http://forums.arrowheads.com/forum/g...leo-field-trip
    You replied to a question I had about knives, and I had missed your answer - so, a belated thanks for your response!
    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.
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