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Probing for artifacts

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  • Probing for artifacts

    Can someone that does this explain to me how this works. it seems to me this would be a hard way to find artifacts. I would think you would have to probe every inch of the place you were hunting and digging up a lot of rocks and roots and so forth. I have seen lots of people talking about doing this kind of hunting. It just doesn't seem to me it would be that productive. Maybe I'm missing something and would love to here more on this subject. Here in West Ky where I live I don't see this working lots of hard clay ground and sure I would spend more time digging and probing than finding anything worth finding. Would like to find out why this is done.
    I Have Never Met A Rock I Didn\'t Like

  • #2
    The General Public are using these Machines?
    http://joshinmo.weebly.com

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    • #3
      What machines?
      I never used a prob Jeff so I do not know exactly how it works. Probably it is in place devoid of stone so when you do hit stone you dig and hopefully find artifacts. That type of digging would never work in New England either perhaps on a beach but not in the woods and fields. Lots of rock up there.
      TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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      • #4
        JoshinMO wrote:

        The General Public are using these Machines?
          All I can say Josh is ??????????? machines :woohoo:  Where do I buy an artifact finding machine?.. :rolf:
        I Have Never Met A Rock I Didn\'t Like

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        • #5
          What I consider probing is I only surface  hunt plowed fields, I went to Lowes and 
          bought a 4 ft round wooden curtain rod, put a 12 inch spike in it and ground it to a point,  as I surface hunt I use the rod as a walking stick poking the spike into the ground every few feet or so

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          • #6
            Oops, Wrong subject. That might come in handy.
            http://joshinmo.weebly.com

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            • #7
              Never tried it Jeff, because we can't dig in Indiana. What I have been reading though is that as you push it into the ground, you can feel what the resistance is like. Sandy soils as opposed to heavier soils, when you hit roots or rocks. Again, not sure, but it looks like the folks that use them look for signs in soil conditions, different soils, different colors in a known site to determine where to probe.
              Correct me or clarify if I'm wrong you probers!
              Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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              • #8
                We probe the creeks we hunt.What your actually looking for is rock under sand we call it crunch.Can be a most effective way to hunt artifacts and in some instances the only way when the rock is under two foot of sand!!!Find the crunch find the points!!!There also good for pushing away snakes that get a little too close.

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                • #9
                  There are few places in FL with rocks in the soil.  Usually it's dirt and sand all the way to the hardpan.  So to use a probe is easy.  You can hear and feel the chips, rocks, bottles.  Can also use a probe to check your hole out when getting ready to leave and it's collapsing, checking into the walls.



                  Professor Shellman
                  Tampa Bay

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                  • #10
                    I don't want to bore you Guys but I think this is an interesting story. Several years ago I was helping on an excavation of a Hopewell Village site here in Illinois. The dig was winding down for the summer and the last day we were told to finish up and that the holes would be filled. I was digging alone in a very productive area and something told me not to quit. Finally they insisted I stop. At that point I was 40 inches below the surface. I asked for a probe before I got out of the hole and on the first poke I hit an eleven inch celt about two inches down! The only mark on it was where I hit it with the probe.
                    Like a drifter I was born to walk alone

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                    • #11
                      I think for the most part, probing is practiced when hunting for pottery vessels. Never really even heard of it for stone artifacts.
                      Rhode Island

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                      • #12
                        That's cool!
                        Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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                        • #13
                          gregszybala wrote:

                          That's cool!
                            It was cool Greg but the landowner got to keep it
                          Like a drifter I was born to walk alone

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                          • #14
                            :woohoo:
                            Professor Shellman
                            Tampa Bay

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                            • #15
                              Thanks all for answers to my question
                              I Have Never Met A Rock I Didn\'t Like

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