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  • fire rock

    Sorry for couple questions. I tried to go through Artifact hunting tips and advice. I couldn't find any picture of fire rock as example. If anyone don't mind to share the picture of fire rock which would be helpful! I am trying to get an idea what campsite would be look like.

    Also, would soil be blacker (or different color) from old fire pit?

  • #2
    how do you tell if it is cracked from fire, not from nature?

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    • JoshinMO
      JoshinMO commented
      Editing a comment
      I find some in The Creek, not sure when It's from.

  • #3
    There is a difference I have no pics to share but I have seen my share of fired rocks
    Look to the ground for it holds the past!

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    • #4
      Here's an intact stone from a prehistoric hearth. If I'm near a spot in a field, where a hearth existed, I may find rocks like this. Not sure these photos are the best, but the stones are oftened reddened from having been in a fire. If you can see the reddish tint on this rock, that's the clue it's a hearth stone. It might not seem it, but this is a great example. There is an area where a small area has fractured off as well. Often as not, the pieces that have been produced by a rock fracturing from the fire will also be reddened and will look like they've resulted from a forceful explosion. They won't be smooth-edged, but will have sharp edges. Hard to describe, I only have this intact fire stone to show you....

      Click image for larger version

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      Rhode Island

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      • #5
        I too had the same question, went looking online, and couldn't really get a good feel as for what to look for... but after seeing, you'll be able to recognize it. What I see is broken rocks (that appear broken, not just worn or something) and they always have a reddish color in some areas or spread throughout.

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        • #6
          A fire-cracked rock/hearth from Ohio
          https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ounty_Ohio_USA


          Click image for larger version  Name:	hearth-feature.png Views:	1 Size:	838.7 KB ID:	304367
          If the women don\'t find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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          • #7
            CMD, your rock looks like to be more reddish than this rock (see the pictures). I guess this rock is not fire rock, is it? I found them during my first hunt.

            Olden, thanks for the link! It does help.
            Attached Files

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            • CMD
              CMD commented
              Editing a comment
              I'm not sure. Maybe. Won't always be red, and it helps if I know a field like the back of my hand, and I don't know your location at all. Well, looks like Olden left a good link that will help you...

          • #8
            FCR tends to turn a reddish hue from the oxidization of iron.
            Here's an experiment with stones of different compositions.


            Investigating Monongahela Fire-Cracked Rock_ An Experimental Appr.pdf
            If the women don\'t find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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            • #9
              At our bear camps we did lots of experiments with fire cracked rocks
              One flying piece cut my right cheek open and that really wasn't all that funny.
              Michigan Yooper
              If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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              • JoshinMO
                JoshinMO commented
                Editing a comment
                When You got back Home You could say look what I got Bear Hunting.

              • BabaORiley
                BabaORiley commented
                Editing a comment
                Yeah right Josh that's just how folklore is spun..."well I was down to my last cartridge and this seven foot tall beast was angry...I had one last second to"...

              • Olden
                Olden commented
                Editing a comment
                Sounds like your luck saved you from a more serious injury Ron: in the future, all power stones will come with safety warnings.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enBG2oeFb18

            • #10
              Originally posted by Ron Kelley View Post
              At our bear camps we did lots of experiments with fire cracked rocks
              One flying piece cut my right cheek open and that really wasn't all that funny.
              The impending dangers of bear camp...

              The chase is better than the catch...
              I'm Frank and I'm from the flatlands of N'Eastern Illinois...

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              • #11
                As olden pointed out it is Fire Cracked Rock not fire rock. Charlie nice solid calcined peice of stone there. You do not often see them whole from a fire pit. Good example Olden
                TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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