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Ohio Creek Hunting

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  • Ohio Creek Hunting

    I'm getting stir-crazy in Ohio waiting for the crops to come off. A couple of times I have tried hunting the Auglaize River and feeder creeks. So often I see posts from neighboring states' creek finds from dried up river beds and stone deposits. However, I have found that in the NW part of Ohio - creeks and rivers are not easy to hunt at all. The bottoms are mainly silt and mud. Does anyone else have this issue? If so, could you offer up some advice? Thanks!

  • #2
    I have the same issue here Buckeye. The waterways are just not conducive to artifact hunting for the most part. I know there are several creek beds that probably contain artifacts in them as I have found them in cut banks and adjacent fields. Just a bit south of me the land changes and there are many creeks that are just right for it but they are out of my area.
    Last edited by BabaORiley; 09-04-2018, 04:26 PM.
    The chase is better than the catch...
    I'm Frank and I'm from the flatlands of N'Eastern Illinois...

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    • Buckeye11
      Buckeye11 commented
      Editing a comment
      I once hunted a creek called the Muchinippi for 4 hours. I thought, surely with a solid Native American name like that it would produce. I found out a week later that was a man-made creek. I guess it pays to do some research up front.

  • #3
    Same here in NW Indiana. The creeks and rivers here are glorified ditches, water level changes little, no sandbar or gravel bars, perpetual silt. Like Baba, head south a couple of counties and everything changes.
    Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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    • #4
      South Georgia is just sand .. it’s in my own backyard and nothing . When we move there going to dig out a spring on Chads suggestion. Should find some interesting stuff there .
      Drives me nuts because North of me they have gravel bars and finds .

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      • #5
        Hey Buckeye11, have you tried using google maps to zoom in to creeks near you to see if there are gravel bars? You can find an area that might be interesting to hunt and save yourself some time. Even though I'm also in Ohio, I have the opposite problem, creek access but no farm land to hunt. Careful what you wish for, I have mostly clear creeks bottoms but they are full of broken shale. Shale fractures into triangular black pieces. Looks like a million flint arrowheads when wet. I only seem to find points that are lighter in color. I'm sure the black points are there, just blending in.
        Central Ohio

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        • Buckeye11
          Buckeye11 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hi Flintguy. Thanks for the reply. It seems when I use Google maps to zoom in it gets too fuzzy to recognize a gravel bar. Maybe it's just the way the satellite imaging scanned my region? I have tried other satellite imaging with similar results. Primarily hunting Auglaize, Logan, and Hardin counties in Ohio. Although I would also hate to be in your situation with the arrowhead-looking shale all over. Reminds me of field hunting near a woods where every leaf makes my heart jump a little.

      • #6
        I have a weather app on my phone that gives good images, it is called iweather. if you have one try that. Or you could download the ustopo app, it has good images. Alot of the creeks in my immediate area are mud bottom because of the little river drainage project, but they weren't always that way and most of the sites in my area are situated along those. I have only found 2 points in my creek hunting career, which is quite young still. They came out of a small creek that runs through the bottom of a draw and feeds in to a small man made lake. It has a rocky bottom and river rock all throughout it that washes out of the hillside. If you have any terrain like that in your area you could try that. Small rocky bottom woodland meanders and feeder creeks can be just as promising as the larger creeks a smaller rivers.
        Stagger Lee/ SE Missouri

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