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    I've read a ton on here, another forum, and on a Facebook group about artifacts. I have some questions about hunting.

    #1 If I have a disc up field that I have permission to hunt and it has just rained a bunch, do I need to walk it immediately or can I wait for the ground to dry out?

    #2 I also can hunt a property that is next to a wooded property with a small burial mound. How close would a burial mound be to a village/site that I would find artifacts?

    #3 Are villages/sites typically more likely to be on a certain side of a river/Creek? Like North, South, East or West of the water

    #4 Can you find sites using Google Earth?

    #5 Who owns creeks/rivers? The state? Individuals?

  • #2
    I have a question if you asked on other sites what did they tell you?


    #1 If I have a disc up field that I have permission to hunt and it has just rained a bunch, do I need to walk it immediately or can I wait for the ground to dry out? As soon as possible I walked in the rain. I like looking when it is overcast wet flint pops better on the ground. Easier to see it.

    #2 I also can hunt a property that is next to a wooded property with a small burial mound. How close would a burial mound be to a village/site that I would find artifacts?
    I would not hunt there period. How do you know it is a burial mound?

    #3 Are villages/sites typically more likely to be on a certain side of a river/Creek? Like North, South, East or West of the water Sites are far enough away from rivers and creek that flood will not bother them. They can be anyplace. Not just rivers and creeks , lakes swamps wet lands, they can be in your back yard even if there is just a season spring there.

    #4 Can you find sites using Google Earth? Yes you can

    #5 Who owns creeks/rivers? The state? Individuals?
    Depends on the state you live in.
    Last edited by Hoss; 09-26-2018, 01:07 AM.
    TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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    • #3
      I like The #5 Question. Here in MO People can Own Creek Property, but not The actual Creek. If Navigable The Creek is considered a Public Highway and can be Floated but The Bank's can still be Private Property, even in The Ozark National Scenic Riverway's where People can Camp for a couple Day's. There are Private Property Owner's there also.

      I put The Ozarks Right's or Privileges on here as It has likely caused a bit of confusion Statewide, where People mention below Vegetation,High Watermark or on Gravelbar.
      http://joshinmo.weebly.com

      Comment


      • O.C. Hermit
        O.C. Hermit commented
        Editing a comment
        Josh where is the ozark rights or priveledges you posted ? Im interested in reading it. I own 1/4 mile of creek bank in missouri, its the border of the backside, according to the deed and the bank i own my bank..gravel bars..and 1/2 the creek... its not part of a national orr state scenic river..just a creek. I found holesdug 8n the rock bar last year...and major holes in a bank by an eddy...then it rained..the holes washed out and my nice little eddy is a pool now..a conservationists told me of course its illegal to dig creek banks without permission..and to trespass if theres signage

      • O.C. Hermit
        O.C. Hermit commented
        Editing a comment
        The key word is " navigble"....if youre dragging the kayak because you cant float in one.. probsbly not navigble was my understanding when talking to the conservation

      • JoshinMO
        JoshinMO commented
        Editing a comment
        I don't wan't to read all The result's on My search, but don't take My word just look and read too.

    • #4
      Originally posted by Hoss View Post
      I have a question if you asked on other sites what did they tell you?


      #1 If I have a disc up field that I have permission to hunt and it has just rained a bunch, do I need to walk it immediately or can I wait for the ground to dry out? As soon as possible I walked in the rain. I like looking when it is overcast wet flint pops better on the ground. Easier to see it.

      #2 I also can hunt a property that is next to a wooded property with a small burial mound. How close would a burial mound be to a village/site that I would find artifacts?
      I would not hunt there period. How do you know it is a burial mound?

      #3 Are villages/sites typically more likely to be on a certain side of a river/Creek? Like North, South, East or West of the water Sites are far enough away from rivers and creek that flood will not bother them. They can be anyplace. Not just rivers and creeks , lakes swamps wet lands, they can be in your back yard even if there is just a season spring there.

      #4 Can you find sites using Google Earth? Yes you can

      #5 Who owns creeks/rivers? The state? Individuals?
      Depends on the state you live in.
      I agree with everything that Hoss said. On question #4, yes you can use Google Earth to see what the area looks like, and ID potential sites. Just don't rely on it too much, because anything could have happened since the map was last updated.
      "The education of a man is never completed until he dies." Robert E. Lee

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by Hoss View Post
        I have a question if you asked on other sites what did they tell you?


        #1 If I have a disc up field that I have permission to hunt and it has just rained a bunch, do I need to walk it immediately or can I wait for the ground to dry out? As soon as possible I walked in the rain. I like looking when it is overcast wet flint pops better on the ground. Easier to see it.

        #2 I also can hunt a property that is next to a wooded property with a small burial mound. How close would a burial mound be to a village/site that I would find artifacts?
        I would not hunt there period. How do you know it is a burial mound?

        #3 Are villages/sites typically more likely to be on a certain side of a river/Creek? Like North, South, East or West of the water Sites are far enough away from rivers and creek that flood will not bother them. They can be anyplace. Not just rivers and creeks , lakes swamps wet lands, they can be in your back yard even if there is just a season spring there.

        #4 Can you find sites using Google Earth? Yes you can

        #5 Who owns creeks/rivers? The state? Individuals?
        Depends on the state you live in.
        I said I've read on other sites, this was the only place I've asked questions.

        The burial mound has been documented by the state.

        I live in Mississippi

        Comment


        • #6
          Thanks I am not sure who owns the water rights in Mississippi.. I would steer clear of the burial mound .
          TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

          Comment


          • #7
            Here in Ohio, burial mounds were almost never next to indian villiages. The villages here had tendancy to follow the major rivers and indian trails. You can almost draw a straight line both north and south and east and west that would connect majority of the villages.

            I have heard all the stories that walking a wet field is better right after the rain because the flint glistens in the sunlight. Honestly for me, I find more flint in drier ground. The one thing rain can do is undercover something that was not seen the day before. Be prepared to get some exercise in a muddy field that is for sure.

            In Ohio most creeks, lakes, and rivers are public property meaning that you cannot legally take artifacts from them. Small feeder streams and runs that are adjacent to fields are most of the time private property and you can take what you find.

            I use old archeological maps dated from the 1920s and then overlay them with Google Maps. I drop pins where all the known indian villages were and then find the owner of the property and ask them if I can hunt their fields.
            Last edited by Helldogg; 10-15-2018, 05:00 PM.

            Comment


            • #8
              Same difference, depending on the occupation, the mound may be a part of a site. Here in Arkansas and in certain places in Mississippi, the dead were often buried right under the floor of the dwelling. Since dwellings were almost always on high ground, and occupancy ranged sometimes over centuries, the inevitable buildup of material led to an appearance of a “burial mound” where in fact it was only a village site, mounded up with midden over years, containing burials.

              actual mounds used specifically for burial were far less common than people think.

              You are in the Starkvegas area, no?

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by Jethro355 View Post
                Same difference, depending on the occupation, the mound may be a part of a site. Here in Arkansas and in certain places in Mississippi, the dead were often buried right under the floor of the dwelling. Since dwellings were almost always on high ground, and occupancy ranged sometimes over centuries, the inevitable buildup of material led to an appearance of a “burial mound” where in fact it was only a village site, mounded up with midden over years, containing burials.

                actual mounds used specifically for burial were far less common than people think.

                You are in the Starkvegas area, no?
                Yes I'm in starkvegas and was speaking of Herman Mound and village site

                Comment


                • Jethro355
                  Jethro355 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That one is likely a true funerary mound, though the name itself is misleading. The mounds the Elite were buried in were often also a “chieftan’s mound” where his domicile would have been located as well. In some instances when a chief would die, he would be buried under his home, his home would be burned, new souls would be brought in to cover it all, and the new guy’s house built right on top of it all. This was done in the Spiro, Oklahoma area and other Caddo sites along the Arkansas, Caddo, and Ouachita rivers.

              • #10
                This might sound dumb but here it goes...why do you find so many artifacts in creeks? Is it because the artifacts are lodged in the banks and erosion by water flow has dislodged them? Or because they were lost while fishing/hunting in the creek/river? Or some other explanation?

                Comment


                • Pointhead
                  Pointhead commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Creeks move over time! They don’t run the same exact banks always. They erode banks as they experience floods, people at times would’ve lived right over the freshwater. They were prime hunting and fishing grounds thousands of years ago as well.

              • #11
                Hey OCHermit, I can't find that info for The Life of Me. I know I read It and have It memorized though. I used to really be interested in what's legit, anyway here is a Link that might help or give You a way to contact The State for more Info.
                https://www.nps.gov/ozar/learn/manag...L_053118-1.pdf
                http://joshinmo.weebly.com

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