Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gpr

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gpr

    I have the right land for this.
    Has anyone done anything like this?
    The GPR equipment is not too expensive to rent.
    Heavy equipment is there.
    I can't just go dig up the fields but I would go after the old gravel bars.


    The new and improved forum is great!!

    With all the rain down here the time is right to get something done. When the creeks go down that is.

    Thanks
    Found this that pretty well sums it up. My land is not too far from this. And the old paths of the creeks can be seen like this.

  • #2
    Where about are you located? Also, where did you find GPR that is “inexpensive to rent”?

    i also have a great place to use it, and even have a friend who has lots of experience with it, but last I checked it was $5 k a week for rental...

    Comment


    • #3
      That’s quite the length to go to trying to find artifacts if you ask me.
      call me Jay, i live in R.I.

      Comment


      • #4
        Uffda
        Gary

        Comment


        • #5

          Comment


          • flintguy
            flintguy commented
            Editing a comment
            Interesting, as Jethro has already said, I was under the impression this was a very expensive undertaking. I also know someone who does this as part of his job and says it's very costly. That quoted price is cheaper than renting a power washer.

        • #6
          seem to be having difficulties

          Comment


          • #7
            Warren - We used GPR to locate the earliest grave in our cemetery many years back. It basically bounced a radio signal, like sonar, and read the different layers of soil. You could readily see the ground that was disturbed compared to the undisturbed. Interesting concept.
            Pickett/Fentress County, Tn - Any day on this side of the grass is a good day. -Chuck-

            Comment


            • #8
              Since it's relatively easy digging soil, excavation equipment is there, I know lots of arrowheads have come from right here, Now if the GPR is 5k a week forget it.
              I looking for how you might guess the age of an old creek.

              I'm in Atascosa County.



              Comment


              • #9

                Comment


                • #10
                  Thanks Scorpion68. I think it would be easy to find old gravel bars in sandy soil. A couple generations back, before there were any fences, the guy that cared for everyone's cattle collected arrowheads. Thousands and thousands cover the walls of an old house down there. Iv'e heard about it. Dad's cousin has a bunch too. He said he got most of his walking the creeks. I have seen some of his. Anywhere there might be an arrowhead, that hasn't been searched, there will be arrowheads. I don't want to just dig up the cook/campsite areas but I would take the backhoe to an old gravel bar.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I'm in the middle of Atascosa County. Creeks feeding the Atascosa River cross our property. With Google earth some old creek routs can be seen. Where there are enough big trees the land hasn't been worked too much the old creek path shows up too. I want to do as much as I can before deer season. and when the ground is soft, like now. It's a swamp now. After a few sunny days and the creeks go down. Has anyone ever thrown an arrowheads.comfest? Members retreat, annual get together. I've got the place. Couple hundred people could search away.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      I don't think GPR would be a useful tool for artifact hunting realistically. Think about it, GPR are used for finding somewhat larger signatures underground in the form of voids, metals,wood, denser packed or previously disturbed layers of soil etc. They are not really designed to detect an arrowhead or a bannerstone for instance that would probably give the same signature as any other rock. They might pick up well on pottery for example or for use by professional archaeologist who want to find post holes on a village site or look into a burial site but otherwise I don't think they are suited to be the artifact hunters version of a metal detector yet... Just my thoughts .
                      Josh (Ky/Tn collector)

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I agree there wouldn't be any point using GPR looking for artifacts.
                        I would be locating old gravel bars covered long ago. With google earth you can see where the creeks have changed course in my area. Many areas have been cleared for cultivation and the old course can't be seen, but they are deep enough to not be disturbed. Unlike anything on, or close to the surface. And spreading the fertile soil from near the creeks into the fields have erased many areas of occupation loaded with artifacts.
                        With all I have seen from people searching creeks and rivers, mainly, if not exclusively from gravel bars I would think if you could find them, have the equipment the get to them it might be an untapped source. Considering the many Paleo artifacts from the sand pits down here, accurately targeting where they might be sounds like a good idea to me. I think I will first try to find one by google earth, taking core samples and probing.
                        Thanks for all opinions

                        Comment


                        • Jethro355
                          Jethro355 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Keep me updated on your findings...I’m interested in this...👍👍

                      • #14
                        I can see where it would be useful for that...I think it would work.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X