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Different colored sand in creek bank?

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  • Different colored sand in creek bank?

    Was out creek hunting this weekend and we found these pockets of red-black sand spaced out along the bank in a bend in the creek. All the other soil/sand around it was regular colored but there were these pockets of red sand with black bands in it, all about the size of 2 or 3 basketballs put together and about 6 foot or so below the soil surface. I know some people look for campfire remnants in creek banks. I'm not sure I would know old campfires if I saw them, as I've never had someone that knows what they are doing point them out to me. But is it possible that's what these are? We'd never really seen anything like it. For what it's worth, I found a nice point on the rock bar directly below these, so it got us wondering. We took these pictures after scratching around in them a little so the colored sand has fallen down the bank a little in the photos, was much more of a layer before we started scratching. Any opinions? Just goofy sand or something from humans from long ago?

  • #2
    I know the NA people loved sand.In some places there is a black layer just above the Clovis layer. The black layer is a subject of controversy to Archeologist . I don’t know if that is possibly the layer of which I speak . It’s interesting !
    Lubbock County Tx

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    • #3
      Let’s see the point you found. Here one time I got bored and figured on a average in a normal atmosphere the soil would be one inch for every 100 years so that being said if I was to dig which I don’t I could probably find artifacts in 6 inches deep. But that’s my area yours could be different
      NW Georgia

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    • #4
      Okay I saw that point I’m not sure what age that is?
      NW Georgia

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      • Iowa_Man
        Iowa_Man commented
        Editing a comment
        According to the source below, it's 3500-5000 years old. So what you're saying is if this point is 5000 years old, there is 50 inches of soil that have been deposited on top of what would have been on top 5000 years ago. Therefore this sand is probably too deep to be NA related? We wondered about that and thought it was quite a ways down the soil profile at about 6' but we weren't sure. Maybe just some sort of mineral rich spot there or something?

        https://www.projectilepoints.net/Points/Raddatz.html

      • SurfaceHunter
        SurfaceHunter commented
        Editing a comment
        Depends I’ve heard of people finding Paleo pretty deep I think the hardpan here is closer to the surface more so than other places.

    • #5
      It may sound crazy, but I wonder if you found a spot that's man made. Someone, maybe a hundred or more years ago, could have dug a hole that deep and threw away broken pieces of machinery, maybe like pieces of farming implements, broken junk pieces. And they simply eroded away after all this time. The sand could have been deposited from flooding, mixing all this together in what your now seeing. I see piles of large pieces of broken machinery parts in the woods all the time. They just leave the stuff there to rust away. Like an old bottle dump, but pieces of iron parts from something. There actually seems to be some type of form to this, there's straight parallel lines of a lot of deposited iron. It just looks like something was buried there and rusted away.
      Last edited by pkfrey; 06-25-2019, 10:39 AM.
      http://www.ravensrelics.com/

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      • Iowa_Man
        Iowa_Man commented
        Editing a comment
        That doesn't sound crazy at all! I was actually thinking about that very thing because it does have a "rust" color to it. The only thing that held me up is this particular spot is in some rough country and every bit has wooded and hard to get to now as it was in 1930s aerial photos. Just seemed like an odd place to dump scrap metal or old machinery even back in the day. Very well could be what it is though. I agree, it has some lines to it like junk parts would. Pretty amazing our tools and parts that we drop in the woods will be gone in a few hundred years. Theirs are thousands of years old and sometimes still look like they were knapped yesterday.

      • pkfrey
        pkfrey commented
        Editing a comment
        Something like this could be left behind by many scenarios. Maybe rusted pieces to a sawmill that didn't work out. Or, think of what that area looked like prior to 1930. Maybe some one was trying to clear the land to farm it, and that didn't work. However it happened, there's really not any geologic event that would explain what you have there. Something that was used, or someone didn't want, got buried, and I would say being that rusted away, maybe 125 plus years ago. Look for left over pieces of individual machine parts. Maybe a cog, some bolts or nuts, chain links, etc. Something to narrow down what was buried there. Could it be the left over parts of iron from an old wagon? The axles, wheels, iron braces, etc.?? Those " lines " could be straps or braces of iron that held something else made out of wood together. The wood would have rotted away long ago, leaving the metal parts to rust away in place.
        Last edited by pkfrey; 06-25-2019, 04:33 PM.

      • Iowa_Man
        Iowa_Man commented
        Editing a comment
        You could very well be right. I'm sure I'll be back in this creek again before the end of summer, might have to bring a gardening tool or something and scratch into the spots a little more and see if I can find some iron.

    • #6
      I actually have an area that goes from bright red clay/sand to 1/2 mile beige sand .
      Then down at the creek there are areas of grey clay and black material I believe to be decomposed trees . Long ago fires or farming which was common in the area 1700’s -1800’s . Remember all those farmers changed the typography and some left .

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