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Coins to have in your collection

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  • Coins to have in your collection

    Here are a few from my collection passed on from my elders

  • #2
    Very nice.
    Bruce
    In life there are losers and finders. Which one are you?

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    • #3
      have my Dads collection from when he was a kid, fun to look through.
      Here's my earliest piece though, found this year.
      Click image for larger version  Name:	20160318_153741_edited.jpg Views:	1 Size:	69.5 KB ID:	235049 Click image for larger version

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      Last edited by gregszybala; 12-19-2016, 07:33 PM.

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      • CreekWalker84
        CreekWalker84 commented
        Editing a comment
        Does that say 1853 or 1353?

      • Scorpion68
        Scorpion68 commented
        Editing a comment
        Greg - You should have that appraised. Those early large cent coins were going for over $100 a few years back. Yours looks to be in super condition but can't see the reverse side. Really nice find. ...Chuck

      • gregszybala
        gregszybala commented
        Editing a comment
        1853. Outside of the patina it's like new. I'll post the reverse tonight.

    • #4
      I haven't been big into collecting coins recently but I'm in Europe now and this i should do some metal detecting

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      • CreekWalker84
        CreekWalker84 commented
        Editing a comment
        I'm in the Rhineland part of Germany

      • 2ndoldman
        2ndoldman commented
        Editing a comment
        Pre-Roman

        At the earliest historical period, the territories between the Ardennes and the Rhine were occupied by the Treveri, the Eburones and other Celtic tribes, who, however, were all more or less modified and influenced by their Germanic neighbours. On the right bank of the Rhine, between the Main and the Lahn, were the settlements of the Mattiaci, a branch of the Germanic Chatti, while farther to the north were the Usipetes and Tencteri.[3]
        Roman and Frankish conquests

        Julius Caesar conquered the celtic tribes on the left bank, and Augustus established numerous fortified posts on the Rhine, but the Romans never succeeded in gaining a firm footing on the right bank. As the power of the Roman empire declined the Franks pushed forward along both banks of the Rhine, and by the end of the 5th century had conquered all the lands that had formerly been under Roman influence. The Frankish conquerors of the Rhenish districts were singularly little affected by the culture of the Roman provincials they subdued, and all traces of Roman civilization were submerged. By the 8th century the Frankish dominion was firmly established in western Germania and northern Gaul.

        On the division of the Carolingian Empire at the Treaty of Verdun the part the province to the east of the river fell to East Francia, while that to the west remained with the kingdom of Lotharingia.[3]
        Holy Roman Empire

        By the time of Emperor Otto I (d. 973) both banks of the Rhine had become part of the Holy Roman Empire, and in 959 the Rhenish territory was divided between the duchies of Upper Lorraine, on the Mosel, and Lower Lorraine on the Meuse.

        As the central power of the Holy Roman Emperor weakened, the Rhineland split up into numerous small independent principalities, each with its separate vicissitudes and special chronicles. The old Lotharingian divisions became obsolete, and while the Lower Lorraine lands were referred to as the Low Countries, the name of Lorraine became restricted to the region on the upper Moselle river that still bears it. After the Imperial Reform of 1500/12, the territory was part of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian, Upper Rhenish, and Electoral Rhenish Circles. Notable Rhenish Imperial States included:

        the ecclesiastical electorates of Cologne (without Westphalian possessions) and Trier
        the duchies of Jülich, Cleves, and Berg, forming the United Duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg from 1521
        the County of Sponheim and numerous further Imperial Counties
        the Free Imperial Cities of Aachen and Cologne.

        In spite of its dismembered condition, and the sufferings it underwent at the hands of its French neighbours in various periods of warfare, the Rhenish territory prospered greatly and stood in the foremost rank of German culture and progress. Aachen was the place of coronation of the German emperors, and the ecclesiastical principalities of the Rhine played a large role in German history.[3]
        French Revolution
        Main article: Left Bank of the Rhine

        At the Peace of Basel in 1795, the whole of the left bank of the Rhine was taken by France. The population was about 1.6 million in numerous small states. In 1806, the Rhenish princes all joined the Confederation of the Rhine, a puppet of Napoleon. France took direct control of the Rhineland until 1814 and radically and permanently liberalized the government, society and economy. The Coalition of France's enemies made repeated efforts to retake the region, but France repelled all the attempts.[4] The French swept away centuries worth of outmoded restrictions and introduced unprecedented levels of efficiency. The chaos and barriers in a land divided and subdivided among many different petty principalities gave way to a rational, simplified, centralized system controlled by Paris and run by Napoleon's relatives. The most important impact came from the abolition of all feudal privileges and historic taxes, the introduction of legal reforms of the Napoleonic Code, and the reorganization of the judicial and local administrative systems. The economic integration of the Rhineland with France increased prosperity, especially in industrial production, while business accelerated with the new efficiency and lowered trade barriers. The Jews were liberated from the ghetto. There was limited resistance; most Germans welcomed the new regime, especially the urban elites, but one sour point was the hostility of the French officials toward the Roman Catholic Church, the choice of most of the residents.[5] The reforms were permanent. Decades later workers and peasants in the Rhineland often appealed to Jacobinism to oppose unpopular government programs, while the intelligentsia demanded the maintenance of the Napoleonic Code (which was stayed in effect for a century).[6][7]
        Prussian influence
        See also: Rhine Province
        Regierungsbezirke of the Prussian Rhine Province, 1905 map

        A Prussian influence began on a small scale in 1609 by the occupation of the Duchy of Cleves. A century later, Upper Guelders and Moers also became Prussian. The Congress of Vienna expelled the French and assigned the whole of the lower Rhenish districts to Prussia, who left them in undisturbed possession of the liberal institutions to which they had become accustomed under the French.[3] The Rhine Province remained part of Prussia after Germany was unified in 1871.

      • CreekWalker84
        CreekWalker84 commented
        Editing a comment
        So what you're saying is there's a huge history of material to find out there ?

    • #5
      Hey Brandon, I like the Indian head pennies and Buffalo nickels. I had a paper root 57 years ago. I saved rolls of Buffalo nickels and even several Indian head pennies from the change I collected.
      Michigan Yooper
      If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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      • CreekWalker84
        CreekWalker84 commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree

      • 2ndoldman
        2ndoldman commented
        Editing a comment
        I wonder how many of us did have a paper route back in the day? Mine was the Toronto Telegram back in the early 60s.
        Back then though I was more into stamp collecting.

      • gregszybala
        gregszybala commented
        Editing a comment
        Gary Post Tribune. Gary, Indiana. Late fifties, early sixties?

    • #6
      I found an Indian Head this spring...1906 I believe...nice Merc dime there...yep remember the paper route well Chuck...
      The chase is better than the catch...

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      • #7
        love that indian head peny

        when i was much younger about 11 years old
        i collected coins for several years

        sold off my collection when i became a teenager to help buy my first car
        i know,i was young and dumb

        now i have a much smaller collection of coins,mostly old silver coins and pennies
        my wife collected them for me when she worked as a bank teller

        people would bring in coins to cash in after a family member passed on
        when she sorted the coins she would trade out any old silver ones and pennies and bring them home for me
        i have some that re in great condition,and some that are not such good condition

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        • CreekWalker84
          CreekWalker84 commented
          Editing a comment
          That's awesome. Having a wife in the business would be helpful 😀

        • gregszybala
          gregszybala commented
          Editing a comment
          What a way to collect!

      • #8
        I'm I the only Arrowheads.com member in Germany ?

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        • gregszybala
          gregszybala commented
          Editing a comment
          Well yeah, but we can safely say that between Sunny, Painshill and you Arrowheads.com appeals to an international crowd! (well kind of)

      • #9
        it was nice,but she switched careers about 8 months back so i have to get them on my own now

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        • #10
          Click image for larger version

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          • Havenhunter
            Havenhunter commented
            Editing a comment
            Those are some nice Morgans & a Walking Liberty you have there.

          • CreekWalker84
            CreekWalker84 commented
            Editing a comment
            Those are nice. Good set there

        • #11
          Historical coins never interested me until my dad passed in 2010 and, while I was cleaning out his desk, I found a lock box containing several gold coins. I almost fainted! Gold was well above $1500/oz at that time and they were just sitting there unsecured. He was 94 and had apparently forgotten all about them, because just before he died he asked me to take several coin binders filled with Morgans to his coin dealer to sell, which I did. It was like the proverbial tin can buried in the yard! Those gold coins started my interest in coins, although those are now safely tucked away at the bank.
          Child of the tides

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          • #12
            Very nice coins guys. I have some but no photos handy.
            TN formerly CT Visit our store http://stores.arrowheads.com/store.p...m-Trading-Post

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            • #13
              Originally posted by CreekWalker84 View Post
              I haven't been big into collecting coins recently but I'm in Europe now and this i should do some metal detecting
              Yes you should. Use caution and be careful that you do it legally.
              Oh and get a descent detector, don't go overboard and get one you may not be satisfied with though.

              Jess B
              It is a "Rock" when it's on the ground.
              It is a "Specimen" when picked up and taken home.

              ​Jessy B.
              Circa:1982

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              • CreekWalker84
                CreekWalker84 commented
                Editing a comment
                Know any good websites that have German laws for metal detecting ???

            • #14
              You may try THunting or perhaps TreasurquestXLT.
              You could get some world wide info there
              Jess B.
              It is a "Rock" when it's on the ground.
              It is a "Specimen" when picked up and taken home.

              ​Jessy B.
              Circa:1982

              Comment

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