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Relic Collecting Ramblings

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  • #16
    One time I was walking a field that had gotten rain the night before. Along the creek is a bunch of old oak trees 100s of years old by the size of them. I had just walked down to look at the creek level which was high and turned around to walk the field instead. I got about a 100 feet away from the tree line and heard a cracking noise. Turned around just in time to see the big oak tree I was just under 15 minutes ago snap in half. Mother Nature did it but just one story many more to come
    NW Georgia

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    • #17
      I’ll ramble a little about today’s hunt. Flakes and a few pottery pieces (no pictures). I could say it was a skunk hunt but if any seasoned creek hunters know it means something is washing out. That’s usually the first thing you will find. I also believe they would have a empty pot next to them when they chipped the stone and made points then put the finished points in the pot so when needed they were ready to be used.
      NW Georgia

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      • #18
        I thought of this on last night.
        So some of you have heard of the Shanks Ferry Native pottery. I had found the site and visited it many times. The site is wooded so it’s hard to find anything there. There is a big power line the runs across the site. There is also a rail road track on the top of the hill. So one time I took a friend there, and as we climbed the hill on the power line to the site, I was in the lead. I stomped on a pile of brush and stepped forward thinking nothing of it. My friend Kevin followed me and as he crossed the brush pile he was swarmed by Yellow Jackets that were nested in the pile I just stomped on. Kevin screamed and yelled in agony and passed me in a split second and up the hill he went. He left me in the dust the, dust of swarming Yellow Jackets. At the top of the hill we stopped on the rail road tracks to catch our breath. In a second the bees were all over us and stinging again. So we ran out the tracks another 100 yards to escape. No luck. Those bees followed our fear sent and were on us again in seconds. We ran another 100 yards or so, looking back. “There still coming” Kevin yelled. Still running and as we turned around again there was just one single Yellow Jacket still following us. Running again with stings all over us we stopped. We carefully watched. We had finally out run the swarm. Needless to say that was the end of our hunt. Out of wind and swelling and itching all over, licking our wounds, we made it out another way. I have always been very careful about stumping on brush piles ever since. Kim

        Knowledge is about how and where to learn more Knowledge that you seek. Snyder County Pa.

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        • Hoss
          Hoss commented
          Editing a comment
          As teenagers a friend and I were walking along the Housatonic River in Shelton CT.The river there is tidal as it flows into Long Island Sound about ten miles south. I stepped on a nest and the yellow jackets swarmed. I was bit just one time my friend 63 times. Turns out he had never ever been stung in his life. The fist sting caused him to say "Aghhh! a bee"! ( funny as I wrote that I could still hear his voice filled with fear. and he froze! I said run dude . we ran about twenty feet and the river was flooding so it was up over the path. " I said do you want to go in?" He said no way so we ran right back through the swarm . I got one bite on my wrist. he was covered in bites they were in his shirt in his pants. His mother told me they were crawling out ibn the house when he got home. Anyway I don't fear them. I think fear triggers more aggression from them. Thanks for the story.

      • #19
        My Dad didnt look for arrowheads. He had a decent display he had found, incidentally, farming. I hunt every chance I get, and he enjoyed talking to me about them.

        One spring, i'd been on a week long streak of hunting. I'd been all over half of Western Ky. Walked about 1,000,000 miles. Stopped in the farm shop to visit. He asks if I've been having any luck....

        Me: "Nah. Bunch of brokens"

        Daddy: "I found one the other day, checking the corn. It was one of those with the channels running up the sides"

        Me: "Do what? Like a flute??" (skeptical)

        Daddy: "yeah! Flute. That's it."

        Me: "Bulls*@t"

        Daddy: "No, seriously. Its laying on the kitchen counter"

        I jump in the truck, and run up to his house. Sure enough, there's a beautiful fluted Redstone laying on the kitchen counter with a pile of pocket change and some washers. Lucky dog!

        He's been gone 4 years, this May. Feels good to reminisce. Thanks friends....
        Western Kentucky

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        • Mattern
          Mattern commented
          Editing a comment
          Good story Mailman, Thanks for sharing.

      • #20
        I was NOT there but I heard when it happened and have continued to hear about it for decades now... There was a group of diggers that trespassed, cut and broke fences here in FL. I was friends with a few of them but I never, thankfully, was considered a "member" of that group. In fact I was called "Chicken" for not going to some places they were hitting hard..like Gainesville. The story goes that a landowner came upon a few of these in the group digging on his land and confronted them at the holes. He wound up either getting hit with a shove, or not....and was forced to stay in a hole until they decided to leave.... I am pretty sure this is a true story. Some of these diggers have passed away now. OMG what some people will do for point-greed. Some characters are downright scary and dangerous.

        One time somebody I know was digging with two other buddies. they got dropped off by the a friend/landowner under a highway sign. When they finally stopped to dig they we were not sure if we were on the exact property or exactly within the property lines. Not a known, recorded site. One feller likes to gander around looking at bugs and plants when not actively digging and when he gandered he saw a white, marked pickup across a slough and three fellers in uniforms got out and were yelling at him so he did what was right. He looked around like he was hearing something and slowly, then more swiftly and now hunkered down he left that area and went to tell his buddies in the hole. Took five seconds for everyone to take off through the woods. All three went in three different directions! One guy went out to a main road and thought he'd pretend that his girlfriend had put him out of the car with his camera LOLOL and while walking he saw three different types of LEO pass by and looking for what were now "trespassers". DENSE, stickery FL woods. One guy ran, then hunkered, then ran again til breath was metallic and he fell down and scrambled under a saw palmetto bush....and fell asleep from the exertion and intensity!! He woke up hearing people rustling through the woods and peeped. It was LEO!!!!! OMG what does through the mind!!! Quiet for at least an hour then more rustling....got closer and closer. OH SNAP. When about 10 feet away he could see it was one of his friends. They went back through the woods together now to get to where they were dropped off and when they got close they could see vehicles and see people...all in uniform. Sneak back. OMG heart pounding and exhausted. Took 2 more hours of trudge to get to a place to call for rides. The camera liar made it to a gas station and phone, had called someone's wife and told them they couldn't be found yet and probably were caught, etc....@! No cell phones back then. When they all got together and met/picked up by the original landowner they found out that they were digging on his property fine but the gandering was seen by workers and they called the police, FWC etc because they assumed there was hunting/poaching going on. Somebody lost a few years of Life with this experience and also made them sure forever again where exactly they were digging LOLOL
        Professor Shellman
        Tampa Bay

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        • #21
          Scary Tom
          Knowledge is about how and where to learn more Knowledge that you seek. Snyder County Pa.

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          • #22
            Mattern, I have told this story before but I don’t believe you have heard it . You know how you hear how people found buckets of arrowheads/points 50 years ago ? It’s true . My brother and I collected stamps , coins you name it but not NA artifacts . I don’t believe we thought they were rare because they were all over the place .
            When I say place I am talking about lakes in Michigan . I can’t remember what area but it was off the grid with out houses and a well . Always visiting Aunts .
            Coming to the point here . We would be playing in the lake and always stepping on sharp rocks . Then we would pick them up with our toes and ask Father what are these?
            arrowheads ! He replied They were all over the lake bed in the shallows . We just picked them up and played war knowing this was a weapon throwing them at each other . I remember them in my palm
            small and sharp .
            If only someone was a collector . But with buckets of them I guess not .

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            • Mattern
              Mattern commented
              Editing a comment
              That reminds me of another story. Like yours. Thanks for posting. I hope we can continue to get others to post their stories on this thread. Kim

          • #23
            I used to co-chair an Indian Powwow in southern York County Pa. At the Indian Steps Museum. I got Artifact collectors together to display their finds. I heard many stories. So this collector told me that when he was a kid, his father farmed Bare Island. Yep that's the one, the Bare Isl. point is named after. He said he had a western flyer wagon there, and while dad was farming he and his friends would walk the fields and pick up Artifacts and pile them in the wagon. Get this, at the end of the day they would take the wagon to the upstream end of the island and throw all the artifacts in the river! (They didn't think they were worth anything). And the reason they throw them away was so next time when they came along with Dad they wouldn't find the same ones over and over again. He said he has kicked himself in the arss so many times he can't count. He now realizes value of Bare Island Points. True story! Kim
            Knowledge is about how and where to learn more Knowledge that you seek. Snyder County Pa.

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            • #24
              There are a lot of grave sites from the late1800’s when people were farming and settling in rural parts of S West Georgia . When they dug the graves. points and knives that were of a Native American were not collected . We go look at the graves and names and pay our respects just to look at the dates . But a good rain brings up points . My friend found a perfect 5 in blade . Just old dirt washed away from piles .

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