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Oldest Tree in Eastern North America

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  • Oldest Tree in Eastern North America

    2600+ years old.....

    Rhode Island

  • #2
    Cool Charlie! Your inbox is full, but I was wondering if You have seen an Article about Dog's buried at Stilwell Site in Illinois? I can't find much about It.
    http://joshinmo.weebly.com

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    • CMD
      CMD commented
      Editing a comment
      No Josh, I have not. But thanks for heads up on my inbox. Hope I just cleaned my PM's out enough....

  • #3
    That was very interesting and amazing as well. Thanks Charlie
    My name is Gary. I live in NE South Dakota

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    • #4
      Thanks Charlie, That is an interesting video. I had no idea there were such huge (and old) Cypris in the east. The fact that Dendrochronology can point to an exact year is way cool. Dendrochronology aged structures on Oak Island to an exact date. It's a very useful science.
      Michigan Yooper
      If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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      • #5
        Another story on this very cool discovery:

        https://www.wect.com/2019/05/09/worl...bladen-county/
        Rhode Island

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        • #6
          Thanks Charlie that is amazing!
          Look to the ground for it holds the past!

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          • #7
            Dendrochronology is also used to date old structures:

            The first use of dendrochronology to date buildings began in the early 20th century, to date Native American structures in the South West.
            Dendrochronology was used to help determine why Jamestown and the Lost Colony were unsuccessful. It was found that during the settlement time of these colonies we had the worst droughts in 770 years.

            Michigan Yooper
            If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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            • #8
              Interesting to say the least... I don’t like the idea of coring the trees, even if they say it won’t hurt em. Now that they know how old they are, I’d say just preserve , live and let live...

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              • #9
                Had no idea, thanks Charlie.
                Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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                • #10
                  Thanks for posting. Very interesting.

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                  • #11
                    I just want to add these resources for those interested in dealving into this discovery, or visit the area. I know one of my nieces, who works for the EPA in North Carolina, will likely be doing so, not sure just when. Sounds like my sister may make the effort as well....

                    Here are a couple of resources.

                    https://www.nature.org/en-us/get-inv...iver-preserve/


                    https://cypress.uark.edu/


                    The scientific paper announcing the discovery:

                    https://cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com/wordpr...ss-Article.pdf
                    Rhode Island

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                    • #12
                      Just delightful Charlie . I read about this in the news last week and knew you would be on this . Makes me appreciate the Bristol cone pines I have been honored to ski along in the west .

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