Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Americas stone hing

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Americas stone hing

    Americas stone hing , Has any had the chance to visit this ?
    Any thoughts, on who they were .... Not really buying into what I am reading .... Don't know ?...
    As for me and my house , we will serve the lord

    Everett Williams ,
    NW Arkansas

  • #2
    Ah yes... stonehinge... I know it well! (sorry... couldn't resist).

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Stonehinge.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	119.2 KB
ID:	179567

    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey Everett, I have seen several stories of sites that were built with attention to the summer and winter solstice. Not sure which one you are referring to. I think your post may be missing a link.
      Michigan Yooper
      If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm guessing you mean the site at Salem, New Hampshire formerly known as "Mystery Hill". Wiki has a fairly balanced summary of what is and is not known about the site:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America%27s_Stonehenge

        The archaeological consensus is that it's modern.

        I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

        Comment


        • #5
          There is actually a Woodhenge at Cahokia.http://www.greatriverroad.com/somadc.../woodhenge.htm
          Like a drifter I was born to walk alone

          Comment


          • #6
            I tried to visit but the door was closed!
            And Roger, you beat me to it! Ha!
            Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

            Comment


            • #7
              I want to just emphasize again, when asking the question did natives in the Northeast sometimes build in stone, to consider what we know regarding the Narragansett. The Queen's Fort, named for a female sachem of the Narragansett, with whom the fort is associated, is a stone built wall, with "bastions" at 2 corners. Atop a steep hill covered with glacial boulders. Basically atop a boulder dump. Long considered a fort built by the Narragansett during King Philip's War(1675-76). The "bastions" certainly support that interpretation. But, it may be earlier. There are celestial alignments involved, and today's Narragansett have long regarded it as a sacred site going back much further then the 17th century.

              And the second clear fact concerning the Narragansett. From earliest colonial times, they were regarded as the finest stone masons in southern New England. If they were not accustomed to building drywall constructions, then how is it they were the finest stone masons, without ever having been taught stone masonry by the English? Good question, if you ask me!

              In addition, there are several cairn field locations in RI regarded as "sacred" by the Narragansett and places of pilgrimage for generations.
              Last edited by CMD; 10-27-2015, 10:26 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                This is the 1989 book, both authors have since passed away, that turned the "alternative tide" in the direction of Native American stone work, and away from megalithic builders from across the Atlantic. Today, there is no group in New England more involved with identifying "sacred landscapes" then the people called Narragansett. It was largely the Narragansett who derailed a Ma. airport expansion because of the presence of a sacred landscape site. The federal government sided with the natives. And, this entire effort to re-examine Northeastern sites can be traced back to the early efforts to identify "Mystery Hill" as a prehistoric site.

                http://rockpiles.blogspot.com/2009/0...ers-falls.html

                A film was made: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/gfalls.html

                "Great Falls explores the blind spot of Eastern US Native history, destroying the widely-held belief that the stone structures found all across the landscape are nothing more than European colonial stone fences. As the film explains, there is no easy colonial explanation for any of these sites. Instead, the easy explanation is that these ceremonial stone structures are integral to an understanding of ancient Native astronomy based on their practices that ritualizes place. Great Falls convincingly makes the case that through an understanding of these places, which is firmly based in Tribal knowledge, we will finally 'discover America'--although they had to wait until the 21st century to do so."
                Dr. Phil Bellfy (White Earth Anishinaabe), Founding Faculty Member, American Indian Studies Program, Michigan State University, Executive Director, Center for the Study of Indigenous Border Issues, Author, Three Fires Unity: The Anishnaabeg of the Lake


                Last edited by CMD; 10-27-2015, 10:33 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here is the report on the Flag Swamp Rockshelter, Ma., which was found to include a prehistoric stone built wall. Proving natives in the Northeast did build in stone at times.....

                  https://www.sec.state.ma.us/mhc/mhca...ers_REPORT.pdf

                  Comment


                  • Ron Kelley
                    Ron Kelley commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thanks Charlie, Lots of interesting history there. Besides the shelter I like the tools they uncovered.

                • #10
                  I took these photos of Queen's Fort, in Exeter, RI, in the late 1970's.

                  First, an old plan of the fort, drawn in the mid 1800's. Note the presence of 3 features resembling bastions. Notice the bastion at the SW corner. It was rebuilt by unknown parties in the 1980's, and a spiral arm was added to it. This fooled Mavor and Dix. In their study, Manitou, they thought it was original to that feature. I don't believe it was...



                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 1.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	178.0 KB
ID:	179742

                  Here is what the remains of the SW "bastion" looked like before it was partially rebuilt:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 2.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	74.8 KB
ID:	179743

                  Photos taken of the SW bastion after rebuild. That's me for scale. Set timer on camera, run into field of view to provide scale:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	queen's Fort 3.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	52.8 KB
ID:	179744

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 4.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	71.3 KB
ID:	179745

                  Remains of low stone wall on south side of hill:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 5.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	43.7 KB
ID:	179746
                  The approach from the south side of hill:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 6.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	83.9 KB
ID:	179747

                  The approach from the north side. A hillside of boulders. A glacial boulder dump:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 7.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	44.0 KB
ID:	179748

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    An associate at the "bastion" in the NE corner of the "fort": Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 8.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	69.6 KB
ID:	179751



                    An unusual feature aside the NE bastion: Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 9.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	53.2 KB
ID:	179752



                    Here is the plan as drawn by Mavor and Dix in 1989. Note the spiral arm at the SW bastion. Part of the rebuild, not original to the best of my knowledge. Note the Winter Solstice allignment: Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 11.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	24.8 KB
ID:	179753



                    And the photo by Mavor and Dix showing rebuilt bastion with spiral extension. In the first photo of me standing in that bastion, seen above, you can see the beginning of a spiral extension at the entrance: Click image for larger version

Name:	Queen's Fort 12.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	53.4 KB
ID:	179754



                    So that's the Queen's Fort. It was not discovered by colonial forces until after the end of King Philip's War. Mavor and Dix note a Winter Solstice sunset alignment. See their plan above. The Narragansett regard it as older then 17th century. Traditionally, however, it was attributed to a Narragansett named "Stonewall John". Perhaps he worked on an earlier structure. The walls were certainly higher at one time. Advantage to the defenders if this was a fort.....

                    There are a number of stone built hilltop "fortifications" in the Southeast. Is this a similar example from the Northeast?
                    Last edited by CMD; 10-27-2015, 10:07 AM.

                    Comment


                    • OnewiththewilD
                      OnewiththewilD commented
                      Editing a comment
                      it looks like that rebuilt section is where someone made a hunting blind out of it,seems like a nice hidden spot with a good overlooking view with enough room to lay yer pack down and still have plenty of shootin' room in. thats my guess.

                  • #12
                    I know where an overhang is that has a rock wall built around the front of it , it's about chest high and on one end it has a walkway into the overhang... Pretty cool .... Charlie , thanks for your input and reads , they were awesome ... Thanks for your time ...
                    As for me and my house , we will serve the lord

                    Everett Williams ,
                    NW Arkansas

                    Comment


                    • CMD
                      CMD commented
                      Editing a comment
                      You're welcome. I do get into it, lol....

                  • #13
                    Good stuff Charlie, thanks.
                    Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      OnewiththewilD commented
                      Yesterday, 04:56 PM
                      it looks like that rebuilt section is where someone made a hunting blind out of it,seems like a nice hidden spot with a good overlooking view with enough room to lay yer pack down and still have plenty of shootin' room in. thats my guess.



                      I think it was more likely neighborhood kids playing. Saw them out there a lot. Why would a hunting blind need a fancy spiral built off of it?
                      Last edited by CMD; 10-28-2015, 06:43 AM.

                      Comment


                      • OnewiththewilD
                        OnewiththewilD commented
                        Editing a comment
                        why not? plus that way you could still walk in but it would still give you full coverage, its just a guess really, i'd have too see it in person myself. i dont know if you could even hunt out there, its just a guess. maybe it could be neighborhood kids moving the rocks too though.

                    • #15
                      The nomination for federal status includes much anecdotal info and description of 1978 archaeology survey. Only one artifact found, a 17th century clay pipe fragment:

                      http://www.preservation.ri.gov/pdfs_...ueens-fort.pdf

                      Plan of fort in 1978, and photo of entrance to the Queen's Chamber:

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X