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Paleo Stonehenge in Virginia?

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  • Paleo Stonehenge in Virginia?

    Don't know about the stone circles, but the "effigies" leave a great deal to the imagination and that doesn't work for me.....
    http://www.newsleader.com/article/20...ginia-property
    Rhode Island

  • #2
    Seems it's not just the effigies, is there documentation, pictures? And a piece of jasper creates a whole theory?
    Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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    • #3
      I almost called plagiarism, on those eppigies, I could have sworn they got them from this site. :rolf:  :rolf: I am sorry but this is more than a stretch, no matter how you try and justify this. This reminds me ..... It must be true they cant put anything on the internet that is not true.   :dunno:  :rolf:
      Look to the ground for it holds the past!

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      • #4
        Hranicky is a well known supporter of the Solutrean hypothesis. I don't know if he's professional or self taught as an archaeologist. I doubt that he's buying into those eppigies, but who knows. The site might be what he thinks it is, but obviously this article contains no evidence.
        Rhode Island

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        • #5
          gregszybala wrote:

          Seems it's not just the effigies, is there documentation, pictures? And a piece of jasper creates a whole theory?
            There may be something there that represents what Hranicky believes, namely astronomical alignments in stone, but I guess we will have to wait to really know. The finder is on his own when he says:
          "The palm-sized pieces of stone appear to depict animals, like bear, mammoth and bison.
          It takes someone with a background in stone work to pick out these effigies, Chris said, to understand the difference in a “worked stone.”
          if Hranicky never told him different, then I guess we have an archaeologist who accepts these types of eppigies! Quite a setback.
          Rhode Island

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          • #6
            gregszybala wrote:

            Seems it's not just the effigies, is there documentation, pictures? And a piece of jasper creates a whole theory?
              There may be something there that represents what Hranicky believes, namely astronomical alignments in stone, but I guess we will have to wait to really know. The finder is on his own when he says:
            "The palm-sized pieces of stone appear to depict animals, like bear, mammoth and bison.
            It takes someone with a background in stone work to pick out these effigies, Chris said, to understand the difference in a “worked stone.”
            if Hranicky never told him different, then I guess we have an archaeologist who accepts these types of eppigies! Quite a setback.
            Rhode Island

            Comment


            • #7
              This turned out to be old news, as described here:
              http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2796942/posts
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Hranicky
              "In 2011, Hranicky excavated the Spout Run site in Virginia, which he and the current landowners claim is a paleo-calendar, and announced it as the oldest, extant above-ground site in North America.[2][3] However, the results of his work at the site have not yet been peer-reviewed and it remains to be seen whether the rocky areas are natural or cultural features, or if there are actually any Paleoindian artifacts present.
              Among the growing list of features claimed for the 2-mile complex are a series of concentric rock rings and associated fire hearth, rock art including two sets of "hand prints", direct alignment with both solar solstices, alignment east-to-west with the seasonal equinoxes, a lunar focus, as well as the site’s major feature, a stone altar which also aligns with the summer solstice.[4] No other known Paleoindian sites exist with any of these features, casting doubt on the age and validity of the site."
              Rhode Island

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              • #8
                This turned out to be old news, as described here:
                http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2796942/posts
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Hranicky
                "In 2011, Hranicky excavated the Spout Run site in Virginia, which he and the current landowners claim is a paleo-calendar, and announced it as the oldest, extant above-ground site in North America.[2][3] However, the results of his work at the site have not yet been peer-reviewed and it remains to be seen whether the rocky areas are natural or cultural features, or if there are actually any Paleoindian artifacts present.
                Among the growing list of features claimed for the 2-mile complex are a series of concentric rock rings and associated fire hearth, rock art including two sets of "hand prints", direct alignment with both solar solstices, alignment east-to-west with the seasonal equinoxes, a lunar focus, as well as the site’s major feature, a stone altar which also aligns with the summer solstice.[4] No other known Paleoindian sites exist with any of these features, casting doubt on the age and validity of the site."
                Rhode Island

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                • #9
                  CMD wrote:

                  Hranicky is a well known supporter of the Solutrean hypothesis. I don't know if he's professional or self taught as an archaeologist. I doubt that he's buying into those eppigies, but who knows. The site might be what he thinks it is, but obviously this article contains no evidence.
                    He's self-taught... but we shoudn't hold that against him.
                  He believes "bipoint" technology reached the Americas via the Atlantic at least 35,000 years ago... long before the Solutrean industry in Europe.
                  here's his website:
                  http://www.bipoints.com/1.html
                    Also, have a look at this:
                  http://doubtfulnews.com/2014/05/impo...d-in-virginia/
                  ... and specifically the post by someone called 'B' about halfway down the page. The post begins with: "I was surprised when I clicked on this...."
                  There's something not quite right here (as with many of Hranicky's theories).  :dry:
                  Incidentally, he appears to be (no longer?) listed as an RPA member (Register of Professional Archaeologists), unless there's something wrong with the search engine on their website.
                  I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    CMD wrote:

                    Hranicky is a well known supporter of the Solutrean hypothesis. I don't know if he's professional or self taught as an archaeologist. I doubt that he's buying into those eppigies, but who knows. The site might be what he thinks it is, but obviously this article contains no evidence.
                      He's self-taught... but we shoudn't hold that against him.
                    He believes "bipoint" technology reached the Americas via the Atlantic at least 35,000 years ago... long before the Solutrean industry in Europe.
                    here's his website:
                    http://www.bipoints.com/1.html
                      Also, have a look at this:
                    http://doubtfulnews.com/2014/05/impo...d-in-virginia/
                    ... and specifically the post by someone called 'B' about halfway down the page. The post begins with: "I was surprised when I clicked on this...."
                    There's something not quite right here (as with many of Hranicky's theories).  :dry:
                    Incidentally, he appears to be (no longer?) listed as an RPA member (Register of Professional Archaeologists), unless there's something wrong with the search engine on their website.
                    I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks, Roger. I had communicated with him a couple years ago as he bought a beautiful bipoint out of a Providence, RI collection that he considered one of those bipoints. I hadn't realized he went beyond the Solutrean hypothesis, so to speak. Thanks for that clarification.
                      Rhode Island

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, Roger. I had communicated with him a couple years ago as he bought a beautiful bipoint out of a Providence, RI collection that he considered one of those bipoints. I hadn't realized he went beyond the Solutrean hypothesis, so to speak. Thanks for that clarification.
                        Rhode Island

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi Charlie
                          I added something to my post which you won't have seen, since I was adding it while you were typing. Have another look!
                          I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi Charlie
                            I added something to my post which you won't have seen, since I was adding it while you were typing. Have another look!
                            I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I consider Hranicky to be a personal friend, and a friend of collectors.....but Jack is an imaginative nut.

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