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Cave Markings Tell of Cherokee Life in the Years Before Indian Removal

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  • Cave Markings Tell of Cherokee Life in the Years Before Indian Removal

    Cave Markings Tell of Cherokee Life in the Years Before Indian Removal

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/histo...val-180971928/
    Professor Shellman

  • #2
    Interesting ! Hopefully more will come and be deciphered ... Written language... ! Sounds like a rough game but I think there have always been gladiators across the globe...

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    • #3
      Cool!
      Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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      • #4
        Great post Tom! The university I attended is heading the Cherokee language Revitalization Project sure wish I took some classes.

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        • #5
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=weS50svvpqg

          "Each of the characters represents one syllable, as in the Japanese kana and the Bronze Age Greek Linear B writing systems. The first six characters represent isolated vowel syllables. Characters for combined consonant and vowel syllables then follow.

          The charts below show the syllabary in recitation order, left to right, top to bottom as arranged by Samuel Worcester, along with his commonly used transliterations.
          Click image for larger version

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          "The Cherokee syllabary is a syllabary invented by Sequoyah to write the Cherokee language in the late 1810s and early 1820s. His creation of the syllabary is particularly noteworthy as he could not previously read any script.[3] He first experimented with logograms, but his system later developed into a syllabary. In his system, each symbol represents a syllable rather than a single phoneme; the 85 (originally 86)[4] characters provide a suitable method to write Cherokee. Although some symbols resemble Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic letters, the relationship between symbols and sounds is different."
          Last edited by tomclark; 04-10-2019, 04:33 PM.
          Professor Shellman

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          • Lindenmeier-Man
            Lindenmeier-Man commented
            Editing a comment
            Truly, that looks complicated to me.

          • Lindenmeier-Man
            Lindenmeier-Man commented
            Editing a comment
            NA language did a great deal in winning WW 2 . If we would of had this to send messages , it would of really messed with the Japanese !

        • #6
          Thanks Tom. You continue to bring interesting articles for us to read.

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