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Expanded New England Typology Guide

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  • Expanded New England Typology Guide

    Just want to draw folk's attention to the soon to be available(by Xmas 2017) revised and expanded edition of the late Jeff Boudreau's "A New England Typology of Native American Projectile Points". This will be the Bible for the typology of the New England states, and if you're a collector from the Northeastern United States, it will be of immense value to you as well.

    176 pages. Notebook size and spiral bound at 8 1/2" x 11". High resolution photos of some 1200 points. All points are shown life size. Several essays dealing with typology in the region, such as an essay on the Narrow Point Tradition, its several forms, and a comparison of New England narrow point forms, and such types elsewhere in the East. A great section illustrating the various lithic types common to the region. A section on blade attrition, showing how the form or morphology of points changes as the result of resharpening. This is useful, as we all know resharpening can make typing points difficult at times. I know I have long found typing points a challenge, something that just is seldom as "easy" as one might think or hope.

    I don't know how one can beat $80 when one considers the cost of producing 176 pages of high resolution color photos. You really can't and I would easily pay twice that for this awesome guide. Take it from me, I have been lucky enough to own an editor's proof edition of this book for awhile now. I've hardly used it! Why, you ask? Because I never wanted it to start to look like a soiled well used book. I have already ordered a second copy so I can also own a well used copy! I loved it so much from day one that I always wanted it to look brand new, lol. I just never knew if there would ever be more then a handful of editor proof copies in existence. I love good typology guides, and as a regional guide, this magnum opus by Jeff Boudreau, this testament to his expertise in the field, simply cannot be beat. I am very excited that I will no longer have to count myself as one of a mere handful of serious collectors with access to Jeff's knowledge.

    Here is a page where you can order this wonderful guide:

    http://www.shop.massarchaeology.org/...1&categoryId=1
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    Last edited by CMD; 11-13-2017, 09:35 AM.
    Rhode Island

  • #2
    Just a tease on the relevant info other then simply a listing of point types.....

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    Rhode Island

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    • #3
      Seems to be a really comprehensive typology guide for New England. Looking at the feature section, they didn't leave much to question. I like the idea of including a regional lithics section because that appears to be the majority of collectors weakness, especially mine. Thanks for the info Charlie.

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      • #4
        Hey Charlie, Thanks for the info and link. I just ordered one. I'm sure I will enjoy this one..
        Michigan Yooper
        If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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        • CMD
          CMD commented
          Editing a comment
          That's great, Ron. I'm sure you will love it. For what it offers, in high res photos alone, they have made it very affordable, IMHO.

      • #5
        BTW, at least 3 members of our forum community, myself, JMatt, and Cgode, have personal finds included in this guide. Each of us had examples included in Boudreau's sample size for the section on Hardaway Side Notch. We all miss Jeff's guidance. He was a wonderful mentor who appreciated and encouraged the participation of avocational archaeologists and responsible collectors in understanding the prehistoric past of the Northeast.
        Rhode Island

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        • #6
          Great job & a great explanation of the Typology book Charlie. I was so excited when I saw the news that I had to just blurt it out, never taking the time to take any pics. The NE members here who do buy this book are in for a real treat.

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          • #7
            Originally posted by clambellies View Post
            Great job & a great explanation of the Typology book Charlie. I was so excited when I saw the news that I had to just blurt it out, never taking the time to take any pics. The NE members here who do buy this book are in for a real treat.
            Alan. I want to thank you for alerting me! When I saw your advice to be patient and "pretty soon" when Mark(METACOM) said he wished the book was available, I said "wow", asked Bill, he sent me the MAS page and I flipped out! Lol. So thank you. I'm most excited for friends who had all hoped to see it happen, and it's as you say, a real treat for anybody who buys a copy. I don't think Chris Gode, our moderator from Ct. knows yet, I'm sure he'll be happy to hear the news. It will be a major resource for the Northeast in general, and the only acceptable outcome for Jeff Boudreau's life work!

            Rhode Island

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            • searchinghawk
              searchinghawk commented
              Editing a comment
              cant wait to get a copy,, i have the first one thanks to Alan

          • #8
            I never had the chance to meet Jeff Boudreau, he seemed to be really accomplished in all that he undertook. Your correct that the only acceptable outcome for Jeff Boudreau's life work was for this book to be published. His lifelong search for the answers and his photographic skills all come together in this book. So unfortunate that he passed away suddenly before it's completion.

            The NE avocational arch community owes a large Thank You to Bill Moody, who undertook putting together and editing this Typology guide. He spend a huge amount of time & effort working on it, when there wasn't even a guarantee of it ever being published.
            Last edited by clambellies; 11-14-2017, 05:40 PM.

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            • #9
              I just received my copy of the expanded version... all I can say is WOW! what an incredible job. Budreau would be so proud to see his work done and done right. Kudos to all involved, bill, Charlie, among others. My hats off to you. I felt like a kid on Christmas morning as I was carefully but hurriedly tearing away the packaging
              Can’t find em sitting on the couch; unless it’s in a field

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              • CMD
                CMD commented
                Editing a comment
                Yep, my copy arrived today as well. With such large sample sizes for the types, it will demonstrate what I already knew: it can be damn hard to name that type, lol. A great deal to learn in those pages....
                Last edited by CMD; 11-26-2017, 06:22 PM.

            • #10
              Do you folks think there is enough crossover between areas that it would be considered usable for the upper Midwest? I know many of your types don't occur here but many do. I use Justice's book regularly but it lacks.
              Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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              • CMD
                CMD commented
                Editing a comment
                I always liked Justice's cluster model for typing points. And he's maybe the best for showing analogous names used in different regions. I think he is out of print and big bucks for that East and Mid Continental edition of his series. I consider Justice one of the very best ever published.

                Earlier today, I went through the entire East Central section in our info center, and very few of the types there appear in Boudreau's book. Our Northeast section, on the other hand, matches it well, but that section was largely created by myself using New England and New York guides. Boudreau is good for the Northeast and further south on the East coast as well.

              • gregszybala
                gregszybala commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks Charlie, that actually convinces me it is worth it. Despite Indiana being in the East Central section that really doesn't represent what went on and is found in and around the Great Lakes. Much of our prehistory is related to all directions of the compass and quite often the East. Travel routes along the Great Lakes are determined by those lakes and when you get to the South end of Lake Michigan coming from any direction they had to go right by my house! Many of the point types in our Northeast section are found here. Merry Christmas me!

              • CMD
                CMD commented
                Editing a comment
                In that case, Greg, you will love this typology guide. A great deal of info therein. Ron ordered a copy, I wish he would weigh in here with his impressions as well. But there's nothing not to like about this book!

            • #11
              I received my copy as well and I am completely blown away. I absolutely love it, so much to chew on here. I too have to give thanks to everyone involved in getting this book out, I am grateful. To say that it has exceeded my expectations would be an understatement. I get a kick out of seeing a Dalton in there that I held in my hands (thanks JMatt ). And I recognize at least one point in there from another forum member (CMD). I'm looking to see if I can spot any other familiar points.

              Fantastic book, thanks again!

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              • #12
                Charlie, I know you treated your Editor's copy with kid gloves and that's a good thing. Now that you've got a second copy you might want to put the Editor's copy aside, as they do become a valuable collectable book in time.

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                • CMD
                  CMD commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks, Alan. I have been leafing through my new edition. I suspect I will try to keep it too in nice shape, lol....

              • #13
                Boudreau includes a new type for New England, Alsop Meadow, named for a site in the Farmington River valley of Ct., and appearing much like an Orient Fishtail when resharpened. Usually ended its use life as a perforator or drill, an observation Boudreau made after assembling a sample from Massachusetts collections. Studying the book and my own collection tonight, I discovered a tool I had that I thought was an Orient is one of these new types. Those of you with a copy will see on page 75 an example from Middleboro, Ma. that is very much like this example from Narragansett Bay. Boudreau shows many, from the Alsop Meadow site, and area collections that were drills or perforators and he speculates these were used as multipurpose tools, not points, and as a froe to split wood for basketmaking. About 1000 years older then Orient at the Alsop Meadow site in Ct.

                i imagine I might have more in my collection. Also "refound" a Kanawha in my collection tonight, helped by the guide, so I'm putting it to good use!

                Here's the Alsop Meadow drill/perforator:
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                Rhode Island

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                • #14
                  WOW I just got my copy of "A New England Typology of Native American Projectile Points" by Jeff Boudreau. The professional photography is awesome. The type descriptions are great. This book is full of great information. Even much better than I had imagined. OK I'm going to leave you for the book now.
                  Michigan Yooper
                  If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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                  • gregszybala
                    gregszybala commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Worth the money for our end of the Great lakes Ron?

                  • Ron Kelley
                    Ron Kelley commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I would say it is well worth the money. I haven't seen too many typology books but this one is far better than anything I have seen before Including on the web.

                  • gregszybala
                    gregszybala commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thanks

                • #15
                  Took me a while but finally bought myself a Christmas present!
                  Searching the fields of Northwest Indiana and Southwestern Michigan

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                  • CMD
                    CMD commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Hope you enjoy it.
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