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  • Gullah Geechee

    A little known American culture...



    Ranky Tanky, a contemporary Gullah band. In the Gullah culture, Ranky Tanky translates as "work it", or "get funky"...







    Last edited by CMD; 06-07-2018, 05:36 PM.
    Rhode Island

  • #2
    That was interesting
    South Dakota

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    • CMD
      CMD commented
      Editing a comment
      Lots of unique cultures in America, something to be learned from all of them....

  • #3
    You’re right there
    South Dakota

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    • #4
      Great post CMD. I found it very interesting. I had never heard of the Gullah Geechee before but I have heard that music I just never knew where it originated. It has a wonderful blend of African spiritual, jazz and gospel...just a great rhythm...I would love to spend a few days with them. I bet that Sunday dinner is outta this world!!! Great post man...
      The chase is better than the catch...
      I'm Frank and I'm from the flatlands of N'Eastern Illinois...

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      • CMD
        CMD commented
        Editing a comment
        I was not too familiar either. Until I read that that particular band is appearing here in Providence this Sunday as part of a big annual Providence festival. So I explored their music a little, and came across the Vice News video describing the culture. I had heard of the development going on there before, but found the story very interesting, as well, unfortunately, a bit sad. I hope some of their heirs lands can survive, but I guess that will be difficult.

      • CMD
        CMD commented
        Editing a comment
        Here's a short piece about the band Ranky Tanky from the June 7, 2018 Providence Journal. Scroll down for the story: http://digital.olivesoftware.com/Oli...AD96&mode=text

    • #5
      Very interesting. Always been curious about Sea Islands.

      This culture managed to retain a strong connection to Africa, but refracted through the lens of their American experience and slavery specifically.


      It's fascinating to speculate about the connections africans made with native americans.

      There must have been some mutual recognition, at least in terms of understanding the natural world (even though Africans must have viewed the Americas as a strange and exotic lands).

      I don't know for sure, but think, that west Africa had moved beyond stone tools at that period. But it was land who's people understood their natural environment.

      How would these people have viewed each other?


      There are a few places and cultures where it must be understood a little (or at least researched).

      I've heard of the Garafuna who jumped slave ships and formed a culture in Belize, and Maroons who escaped Jamaican plantations and allied with what was left of Ariwak natives.

      Then there is the adoption of Indian regalia by blacks in New Orleans and Louisiana (other places too?) .


      The flip side of what could have been potentially sympathetic relations, might be the Buffalo Soldiers.

      Who are poignant in the way they unite black americans with United States' nobel military tradition but also shows the uglier aspects of colonialism and conquest.

      I wish I knew more.


      Ranky Tanky will be the name of my next pet, I think.

      Love the way it rolls off the tung.



      Thanks for the post.


      California

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      • #6
        We have a large Gullah Geechee population in the low country of South Carolina especially around the barrier islands near Charleston and Beaufort . I hope everyone on this forum has the opportunity to visit Charleston one day. There's an old slave market in Charleston that vendors sell their goods including the Geechee. They are wonderful basket makers. A lot of collectors obtain Geechee baskets .
        South Carolina

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