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  • History up close.

    Yesterday was a challenge.
    The site I chose to detect was the nosiest one I have ever been on.
    There were a minimum of 10 - 12 hits with every swing of the coil.
    99% of which were small iron objects.
    And at no point during the entire day did the iron reject symbol ever leave the bottom right of the display. Click image for larger version

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    And that was with no discrimination. Dig a hole anywhere and the pinpointer would sound off on the soil alone.
    Needless to say the planet was not saved. Click image for larger version

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ID:	176124 Brass items were few and far apart. Click image for larger version

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ID:	176125 Does anyone know if that is the English broad arrow on the item on the left? Click image for larger version

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ID:	176126That was the question I asked on another forum. I will update that later on. Gas was not covered on this trip. Click image for larger version

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ID:	176127 And no silver was found. This is the only coin with any age to it. Click image for larger version

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ID:	176128 The day was not a total loss though.
    History up close is this.
    Another friction fuse for the 64 pound cannons that stood at this point to protect against the expected Russian invasion. Click image for larger version

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ID:	176129 Click image for larger version

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    Bruce
    In life there are losers and finders. Which one are you?

  • #2
    As it turns out that brass plug did have the British broad arrow on it and when you see the last pic you can tell that it is a match for this plug at that bottom.
    This is a 112 pound shell but I expect that a 64 pound shell would be quite similar. Click image for larger version

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    And I thank my friend PocoBill for leaving this one behind.
    It came from the same area where he found his gold ring the last time he came over for a visit.
    This one sounded like a pull tab in the earbuds but read like a zinc penny on the display. Click image for larger version

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    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by 2ndoldman; 10-02-2015, 12:10 AM.
    Bruce
    In life there are losers and finders. Which one are you?

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    • #3
      its ours, my precious...give it to us.. my precious..it calls us
      If You Know Your History You Can Predict The Future

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      • #4
        Maybe not the most productive day that you have had but some pretty significant items were given up by the Dirt Demaons.
        \"Of all the things I\'ve lost, I miss my mind the most.\"

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        • #5
          Thanks for sharing and great pics as always, I'm going to get me one of those mine labs one day when, as chase says, when I grow up
          Last edited by OBION; 10-02-2015, 11:25 AM.

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          • 2ndoldman
            2ndoldman commented
            Editing a comment
            Grow up fast my friend. Before I run out of things to find up here and start heading in your direction.

        • #6
          The letters R and L either side of the broad arrow (also known as the “pheon”) indicate the shell plug was made by the Royal Laboratory of Woolwich Arsenal in SE London. I don’t know what the small letter R at the top means, but it’s probably an inspection mark. These plugs were made in a series of universal gauges to fit a wide variety of ordnance and the size of the plug is not necessarily directly related to the size of the ordnance. Often, they were fitted to the nose of the shell rather than the base and would be left in place on “solid” shot (which was actually hollow but explosive-filled) for maximum penetration. On other shell types, such as bursting shells, they were removed before firing to be replaced with a time or percussion/concussion fuse as necessary. They were also used on things like depth charges and could be replaced by a timed or barometric fuse.
          I keep six honest serving-men (they taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.

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          • 2ndoldman
            2ndoldman commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you for the additional information Roger.
            I hope that all is well with you, I have missed your input on my posts.

          • painshill
            painshill commented
            Editing a comment
            Been travelling Bruce... Chicago, St Louis, Memphis and New Orleans. Just got back!
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