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In honour of Veterans Week Nov. 5th - 11th.

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  • In honour of Veterans Week Nov. 5th - 11th.

    Show your pride by posting your collections.
    This is my meager collection.
    Four of these items were gifted to me by Micheal.
    Otherwise they are all personal finds. Click image for larger version

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ID:	270669 The UCC button is also a gift from Micheal Click image for larger version

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    And I am always tickled pink to add another piece to the collection.
    This year has not be the best for militaria
    Hopefully there is more to come. Click image for larger version

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ID:	270671Although this is not military issue it will go into the display due to the background behind the organization. Click image for larger version

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    Bruce
    In life there are losers and finders. Which one are you?

  • #2
    Thought I would post a pic of how I got my screen name -

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    This is an official Navy photo of the USS Scorpion where I served my first sea duty tour in the Navy in 1966. The upper left is the shoulder patch we wore on our over coats and the small strip in the lower center is the shoulder patch we wore on all our uniforms to show our duty station. If you read the inscription at the upper right you will know that Scorpion sand in the Atlantic in May 1968. I was slated to deploy on that mission but received last minute orders change which placed me on USS Ray SSN653. While I was deployed in Ray, we received notice that Scorpion was missing, along with her 99 crew members.








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    • 2ndoldman
      2ndoldman commented
      Editing a comment
      That is very appropriate Chuck. Thank you for the reply and your service.

  • #3
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    This is the boat that I received last minute orders to and was on station when we were notified of the Scorpion's sinking.


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    • 2ndoldman
      2ndoldman commented
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      You are one lucky SOB my friend.

    • Scorpion68
      Scorpion68 commented
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      Tell me - I was seeing ghosts for weeks after. My wife, then fiance, thought I was aboard and was also in the sweats about not knowing. IF not for that last minute change in orders, I'd have been aboard.

    • Hoss
      Hoss commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow you are one lucky guy.

  • #4
    This is the last known photo of the USS Scorpion

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    This was during the Cold War era and we were head to head with the Russians. Many thought that she had been sank by the Russians but that was never proven, nor could it be. Her implosion and breaking up sounds were heard on Atlantic sonar monitors so her sinking can be fairly precisely timed. In the book "Blind Man's Bluff" by Sontag and Drew, they have the conclusion drawn by an experienced Naval Officer that she was the victim of a "Hot Runner", a torpedo that is accidentally activated without proper command. When this happens, the only way to disarm the torpedo and stop the detonation, is to immediately reverse course. This was a safety mechanism built into our torpedoes after WWII when we learned that some of our subs were being sunk by our own torpedoes. It's obvious something went wrong and the course reversal did not work in this case. I agree with this Officers conclusion, unfortunate as it is. But - these were conditions under which we served and were paid $50 extra a month for hazardous duty pay!!!!

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    • gregszybala
      gregszybala commented
      Editing a comment
      Fate.....

  • #5
    Sorry Bruce - I didn't mean to hijack your post. I'll see about getting this moved to the proper "All Others" topic.

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    • 2ndoldman
      2ndoldman commented
      Editing a comment
      Don't you dare have these removed Chuck.
      I asked right at the start. "Show your pride by posting your collections."
      And you did just that.
      Thank you for your reply.

  • #6
    Thanks to both Bruce and Chuck.
    Michigan Yooper
    If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything

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    • #7
      Bruce just wonder finds goodness .
      Chuck I don’t think I ever told you but thank you for your service .
      Boy that is some story . I am sure there is a local paper in your area or a military base that would be intersected in this story . I worked on a military base for 5 years as a civilian and the guys loved these stories . Stores have posted pictures of what you have .
      You should share with a military base . The next time you have a feeling close to a holiday give it some thought .
      So many of these stories and pictures are lost because of what
      Donald said Lucky SOB . You live to tell the story .
      can’t imagine the feelings .
      Donald heavens all those metals can you see all those on a jacket ? Do it lol
      Tam

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      • #8
        VERY little occurred in my local area until after the Civil War...
        Professor Shellman

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        • #9
          My father was in the Navy during WWII, and stationed on an LST in the Pacific Theater. He took part in the Battle for Okinawa, the final battle before what would have been the invasion of Japan. A kamakazi pilot, flying a Japanese Zero, hit the ship next to his. This was a souvenir he made of part of the propeller from that Zero. CAD are my father's initials...

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          Rhode Island

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          • 2ndoldman
            2ndoldman commented
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            That is a very unique piece of memorabilia.

        • #10
          At the conclusion of the war in the Pacific, my father's ship was stationed in Shanghai, China for a month, where he made this. It appears to be made out of some sort of skin....

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          Rhode Island

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          • 2ndoldman
            2ndoldman commented
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            Have you ever deciphered the Chinese script?

          • CMD
            CMD commented
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            No, Bruce, I was wondering myself while looking at it this morn....

        • #11
          My grandfather was in the US Army during WWI. I'm getting old, and can't remember what you call this, lol. Some kind of slide rule? I think a piece is missing....

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ID:	270797 One of my great great grandfathers was in Battery D, First RI Light Artillary, and was killed crossing the corn field at the Battle of Antietam, or Sharpsburg, the single bloodiest day in American history. I have a copy of his unit's diary, which includes a photo of one of their reuinions. Lots of old RI Yankee names, and a few Irish. My great great grandfather was an immigrant from Ireland...

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          Rhode Island

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          • Ron Kelley
            Ron Kelley commented
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            Hey Charlie, Thanks for the history. I used a slide rule when I was in high school. I think that dates us. lol

          • 2ndoldman
            2ndoldman commented
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            Thank you for sharing your family history Charlie.
            Ron is right and I also used one in school. I thought that it was a godsend for math.

          • CMD
            CMD commented
            Editing a comment
            lol, yeah, sliderule it is. I must have used one in high school as well...

        • #12
          Damn Charlie - those are impressive artifacts from WWI and WWII. Not many of those around with the story to accompany them. I'd frame those with a written description. I'm pretty sure that leather piece is pig skin. It has the typical wrinkle appearance and is usually very supple, unless it's backed with another piece of leather. You have an awesome family history that is well documented. It's something to really be proud of. By the by, your Father is what we in the Navy call a Brown Water Sailor. That being the Chinese riverway like the Yangtze, near Shanghai. The name comes from the color of the water being brown or silt-laden from inland washoff. We had them in Vietnam but they were mostly in the smaller PBR's, River Patrol Boats. A most excellent post my friend and your family's military contribution are very much appreciated. By the way - have you done your genealogy research. I imagine your family was also in the Spanish American War as well as our historic Revolutionary War. Very impressive Charlie. Thanks for sharing.

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          • Scorpion68
            Scorpion68 commented
            Editing a comment
            Charlie - you might want to get the Chinese hanzi translated to see what it says. Most Chinese language script is after in Mandarin and it probably wouldn't be hard to find someone who could translate it for you. I'll do some checking to see if I can help. Got's lots of Japanese friends who can help with Japanese but don't know many Chinese.

          • CMD
            CMD commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks, Chuck. Just now saw your last comment. I don't know many Chinese nationals, either. I'm surprised I never bothered to ask my dad, though I'm sure he did not really speak Chinese...

          • Scorpion68
            Scorpion68 commented
            Editing a comment
            Charlie you're probably right about him speaking Chinese but you can bet he knew someone who did. Often times sailors befriend foreign dock and ship workers, especially if the ship's in port for extended periods of time. You can bet he knew what it said.

        • #13
          Well, I hope someone else adds items or memories to this thread, or I am going to feel like a real hog, lol. But, on the other hand, these are pretty interesting. My mother's dad was in the so-called Great White Fleet, 16 battleships and support vessels, all painted white, and which Teddy Roosevelt sent around the world from December, 1907-Feb., 1909. It was an example of so-called gunboat diplomacy, or "walk softly, and carry a big stick", which is how Roosevelt described his foreign policy.

          I have postcards he collected from every port of call. He was on the flagship, the USS Connecticut. His crew was the only ship's crew allowed to visit the Sphinx and Pyramids when they were in Egypt. I have an original photograph from which the color postcard seen here was made, but I don't have a copy of the actual postcard. My grandfather is in the photo, in the back row in front of the Sphinx. In the photo of the handful of sailors on camelback, my grandfather is last guy on the right. The visit was in Jan., 1909. The last photo shows Teddy Roosevelt speaking to the crew of the USS Connecticut the day they returned to port in Virginia. My sister just told me she spotted our grandfather in the photo, she believes. We are going to try and confirm this by comparing to other photos of him while he was in the Navy.

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          Rhode Island

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          • Scorpion68
            Scorpion68 commented
            Editing a comment
            Charlie - When I was stationed in Kami Seya, Japan, we still called the Indian Ocean Fleet the Great White Fleet and the USS Lasalle was also painted white. That helps reduce the absorption of heat rather than our traditional haze grey. I also believe that she had teak wood deck boards bolted onto the decks, which was a holdover from the war. I'm quite sure the USS Connecticut, back in 1909 had the teak wood decks which is usually bleached near white by the sun and also cuts down on heat and glare. I do believe the found out during the war that the teak wood posed a hazard from splintering when hit by shells.

          • 2ndoldman
            2ndoldman commented
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            Chuck and Charlie please do not stop contributing to this thread. I do have a few more items that I will post but I wanted as many members as possible to share their memorabilia and pride.

          • CMD
            CMD commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks again for the added info, Chuck, and for your thumbs up, Bruce. It's been a fun thread.

        • #14
          Click image for larger version

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ID:	270903 I have two collections first is my Grandfathers awards on my fathers side. He served in the Pacific island hopping. He was a surgeon for the army. The bronze star was awarded to him during the battle of Cebu in the Philippines for great leadership handling and managing the mass casualties suffered during this battle. I can only imagine how tough it was working on severely wounded soldiers on a daily basis some making it and some not. Our family still to this day gets thank you notes for saving their family members. I would love to share my mothers fathers contributions in a few days he was with the 20th armored division in WW2 which helped liberate the Dachau concentration camp. I have several albums of pictures of the day it was liberated but I am away from those pictures till after the weekend. Some are to graphic to show here. Thank you all veterans we owe you everything! God bless America!

          Comment


          • 2ndoldman
            2ndoldman commented
            Editing a comment
            Many people served in many different capacities and being a surgeon was one of the most honorable ones that I can think of.
            I would be honored to see what you have from your mother's father.

          • Scorpion68
            Scorpion68 commented
            Editing a comment
            Those are memories, stories and true service to be proud of Sugaree. That Bronze Star is not given out lightly. Be proud of your heritage my friend.

          • Hoss
            Hoss commented
            Editing a comment
            Nice display Wow a surgeon too. God Bless the veterans!. Looking forward to the other collection too. Veterans have stories to tell. Glad you shared yours.

        • #15
          There was another side to war that has not been shown so far.
          That is those who stayed home.
          One of the things that they had to do was endure rationing.
          During WWII, the Canadian Government felt it was necessary to ration certain staple goods. This was done to ensure there was a large enough supply to meet both military and civilan needs. Food rationing came into effect for Canadian civilians in 1942. More than 11 million ration books were distributed. Typical items that were on the ration list included meat, butter, sugar, tea and coffee. While there were shortages, for most civilians this rationing was more of a nuisance than a hardship. Houswives were encouraged to make their own butter from milk, and restaurants observed meatless Tuesdays and Fridays.

          Gasoline was rationed in April 1942 and some Canadians put their cars in storage for the rest of the war. The use of car pools and public transit escalated and coupons were offered to allow car pool drivers extra gas rations. Tires were also rationed and civilians could not purchase them unless they could prove that driving was essential.

          Alcohol was also on the ration list. Civilians waited outside vendors' stores to purchase (at high prices) whatever liquor was available.

          Clothing was another rationed item. By mid 1941, silk was no longer imported so women rushed to purchase all the silk stockings available. Victory stockings, made from yarn and small filaments of silk, came into use



          This belonged to my father's mother.
          Cover page. Click image for larger version

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          The inside covers have user instructions in both English. Click image for larger version

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ID:	270926 This must have been her last ration book because most of the stamps are still here. Click image for larger version

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          Bruce
          In life there are losers and finders. Which one are you?

          Comment


          • Scorpion68
            Scorpion68 commented
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            We had it here also Bruce. I remember my folks talking about how tough it was at times. And our kids think it's tough if they don't have an iphone to take to school!!!
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