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  • #16

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    • #17
      Morning von. Wow that meteorite is awesome... So the pinkish rock near meteorite is a fresh fulgurite? And t he second pic is what ours looks like before ocean tumbling?
      ... Ours looks black like fusion crust we are thinking....ours has many tiny holes..like vesicles. And meteorite has none...and the second pic has tiny holes too

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      • Von
        Von commented
        Editing a comment
        I’m sorry for the confusing pictures. The stone in the picture with my meteorite is quartz from Hiddenite NC. It’s a cool piece and pictures don’t really do it justice. The fulgurite is the second picture. It was the largest piece I could find in the sand trap. I think the combination of red mud and sand made the color black. The fulgurite’s at the coast are white but look like your stone. What was the soil like where you found it?

        Von
        Last edited by Von; 09-01-2018, 09:38 AM.

      • redrocks
        redrocks commented
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        Von the soil is just sand on the beach so I m not sure

    • #18
      It looks like coke to me

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      • redrocks
        redrocks commented
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        Thanx for opinion andy

    • #19
      Originally posted by Andy W. View Post
      It looks like coke to me
      I would tend to agree that it is most likely coke.

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      • #20
        Thanx Charlie for your opinion also...bro in law wants to take it to Yale geology....hes not giving up .....so personally I agree with all 3 of you guys who offered opinions.... And Charlie when we come up the 23rd I'll be sure hr brings it...Red
        . Happy labor day to all workers

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        • #21
          Not a meteorite. Meteorites do not have vugs. This has little gas bubbles. Always do 3 things before wasting time taking it to someone:
          attach a magnet to a string and test for iron. Bring the rock to the magnet. No iron- no meteorite.
          Check for vesicular attributes. If there are gas bubbles - not a meteorite.
          Grind a small window- check for metallic “bb’s”

          im going to say you have something volcanic there.

          Meteroties are very rare and look a certain way.
          Last edited by Tinywolves; 11-08-2018, 07:35 AM.

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          • #22
            Thanks for checking it out and welcome from Connecticut..good advice I appreciate it... Red

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            • #23
              Originally posted by Von View Post
              Hi,

              Its most likely a fulgurite. It’s the result of a lightning strike on a beach or just in soil. They are all over the beaches here in the Carolina’s. They come in all kinds of weird shapes and most folks walk right past them not knowing what they are.

              Von
              Howdy, (Fulminology the study of Lightning)
              Just as these specimens are meteorwrong they are fulgurwrong as well.
              Fulgurites will not have the bubble effect usually they are hollow. Also they occur when "sand" is fused. Black-land soil just will not fuse in this manner.
              Boiler slag where accumulated silicates from coal collected in fire box and was summarily disposed of when cleaning out the device.
              My expertise is limited to my local finds of two locations where strikes occurred eons ago.
              It is a "Rock" when it's on the ground.
              It is a "Specimen" when picked up and taken home.

              ​Jessy B.
              Circa:1982

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              • Von
                Von commented
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                It could be slag?

                Von

            • #24
              Interesting info Jessy.thanks for input...so you have found fulurites and meteorites?

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